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Shooting video in high humidity enviroments


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#1 Jeremy Russell

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 01:28 PM

Hi,

The production company I work for is shooting a video in Peru, and is concerned about
the performance of DV cameras in high humidity enviroments (98% humidity on most days). Does anyone have experience doing so, and what precautions should be taken, or what are some concerns that we should deal with before the trip. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Jeremy
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#2 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 01:32 PM

Hi,

The production company I work for is shooting a video in Peru, and is concerned about
the performance of DV cameras in high humidity enviroments (98% humidity on most days). Does anyone have experience doing so, and what precautions should be taken, or what are some concerns that we should deal with before the trip. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Jeremy



U usually find this in deep caves,high mountains, or near a canal on a hot-sunny summerday.
Also in Peru there are some places with fog, and you should concern this if you are planning to shoot there.And yes fog means high humidity levels too.
I don't have any solutions or advises at the moment, u should consult archives that are related to tropical cinematography.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#3 Tim J Durham

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 02:34 PM

Hi,

The production company I work for is shooting a video in Peru, and is concerned about
the performance of DV cameras in high humidity enviroments (98% humidity on most days). Does anyone have experience doing so, and what precautions should be taken, or what are some concerns that we should deal with before the trip. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Jeremy

Hi,
Take a blow dryer that you can run off of a car lighter socket. The biggest problem is keeping the camera in an air-conditioned hotel room, then taking it out into the humidity. So when the condensation builds up (inside and out) use the blow dryer to heat it up and dry it out.
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#4 Jay Gladwell

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 08:42 PM

Some cameras have condensation sensors that will shut down the camera if the level gets too high.

Another option, if you don' t have a hair dryer, is to put the camera and tapes in a plastic bag before you leave the hotel. Let the bag set outside once you reach the location and allow the camera to reach amibent temperature before taking it and the tapes out of the bag. That way there will not be any fogging or condensation problems that may set off the condendation sensors.

Good luck!

Jay
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CineLab

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Willys Widgets

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies