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Two Wonderful Discoveries


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#1 Tim Carroll

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 09:02 PM

It has been a red letter day for me.

First I stumbled across the new edition (3rd) of Cinematography by Kris Malkiewicz and low and behold, guess who the co-author is, none other than David Mullen. Awesome. And even though I have the 2nd Edition, I'm getting the new one to see what pearls of wisdom David has added to the book. And what better way to thank Mr. Mullen for all the help he has given me and everyone else here on the forums than by increasing the size of his royalty check.

Second, I just got my license key for the Kodak Look Manager System software from Kodak today. It is for the Cinematographer's version of the software, and it's good for ten years. And guess how much it cost? Zero, Zip, Nada. I was floored. I had heard that it was $1000 for the software and license key. Well, I found out that if you are a cinematographer who shoots film, and you talk to your Kodak rep, they will give you a CD of the software and once you install it and give Kodak the "Node" number from your computer, they will give you a license key for ten years, at the cost of nothing. Very good news. The one caveat is that you have to be a "real working cinematographer" who shoots film and I am not sure how they prove that, other than "real working cinematographers" have established relationships with their Kodak reps already, and maybe it is at the discretion of the rep. Not sure. In any case, talk to your rep, it is a really good deal.

Just thought I'd share,
-Tim Carroll
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#2 Tony Brown

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 10:58 AM

Kodak Look Manager System software from Kodak today.



Whats does it do Tim?
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#3 Tim Tyler

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 11:22 AM

http://www.kodak.com...=0.1.4.26&lc=en

KODAK Look Manager System:

Leverages Kodak's unique understanding of color science and film technology to ensure a more consistent image reference.

Allows you to model the effect of a variety of gels, filters, exposure conditions and postproduction techniques on KODAK Film stocks for color, tone and contrast.

Supports creative vision from pre- through postproduction.

Lets all members of the production and postproduction teams collaborate-even from remote locations.

Enables the lab, dailies colorist and print timer to match the exact look for a scene.

Makes it easy to share looks via a file transfer protocol (FTP) site, e-mail or hard copy.

Helps reduce the number of film tests needed to establish a look.
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#4 Tony Brown

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 11:37 AM

http://www.kodak.com...=0.1.4.26&lc=en

KODAK Look Manager System:

Leverages Kodak's unique understanding of color science and film technology to ensure a more consistent image reference.

Allows you to model the effect of a variety of gels, filters, exposure conditions and postproduction techniques on KODAK Film stocks for color, tone and contrast.

Supports creative vision from pre- through postproduction.

Lets all members of the production and postproduction teams collaborate-even from remote locations.

Enables the lab, dailies colorist and print timer to match the exact look for a scene.

Makes it easy to share looks via a file transfer protocol (FTP) site, e-mail or hard copy.

Helps reduce the number of film tests needed to establish a look.



I did try the Kodak site (honest).... all I get is white pages.....thanks for the info
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#5 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 11 October 2005 - 11:46 AM

Whats does it do Tim?


I reciently saw a demo in New York of the Kodak Look Manager System and it seem like a great tool. However I would like to hear some experiences how it can be applied on the set. As I undersand you will need a good digital camera and a calibrated monitor. Maybe on the "time is no matter" big budget feature (as if that really exists) one could set up a station in the corner and run tests but at that stage haven't you figured out what your stock and filterpacks are? On the run and gun shoot it would seem that you wouldn't have time to use it. That's when it would come in most handy. Matching looks in different weather and lighting conditions etc. Is the main use then just setting up your process in pre production? Any real life experience on how to impliment this in a meaningful way would be appreciated.
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#6 Tim Carroll

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Posted 12 October 2005 - 05:39 PM

Sorry it took me a while to get back, been out of town with no internet access.

I plan on using it for pre-visualization (for lack of a better word). When trying to get a certain look for a piece, I will do a light set up and then shoot it with my Nikon D100 digital camera and then take that image and drop it into KLMS and see how it would reproduce with all of the different available Kodak film stocks. You can also see what effects bleach bypass or other processing steps would do to the image. Then when I find a look that I think fits the material, I will test with that. I think it will be a way to get into the ballpark before doing alot of expensive tests with film.

I have not actually used it yet, I just got it last week and my Nikon is being repaired (dead pixels). But I think it will be a helpful tool. As far as the calibrated monitor goes, to use the Production Version, you do need a calibrated monitor because that is for doing color correction and communicating information to the lab and both you and the lab must have your monitors calibrated the same. At least that is how I understand it. And the Production version is very expensive. The Cinematographers version is just the software and you need a digital SLR to go with it.

Hope that makes it a little clearer,
-Tim Carroll
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#7 stephen lamb

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 11:54 AM

Tim,
I read that this little deal Kodak has is only for working cinematographers. I am a film student, i love cinematography, and i plan to shoot film (for student projects and beyond). What do you think Kodak would say to me if i asked them about this deal? It sounds fantastic, and not only that, it really sounds like a great learning tool to help see the difference between stocks etc. Secondly, who would i talk to about it? I am VERY interested and any help would be fantastic. Thanks!
Steve
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#8 Tony Brown

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 12:12 PM

I've got it, not really had time to use it extensively but don't really see the point. A working DP will know what the variations will create anyway, as for creating a guide for telecine, i can do that on Photoshop

Kodak told me there is a new version coming out in January, maybe they could be persuaded to offer this version to students after that?
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Rig Wheels Passport

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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