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Shooting onto reversal print film - possible?


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#1 David Gottlieb

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 11:06 AM

I searched these forums and while several posts have been made on shooting onto intermediate and negative print films, there is very little on shooting onto reversal print film, in this case Ektachrome 7399 Print Film. Could you run it through a camera and any recommendations for processing method and whether dual 85 filters would color correct? Kind of a specific question but I have a lot of this stock sitting around and am interested in using it for as different a look as possible (I love high contrast and saturation as well as the 60s/70s indie looks) and I need to find a good use for it since I just found out that you can't add an optical sound track on it (it's 2R), therefore making it less practical for prints with sound (I have some 7240 I wanted to duplicate onto the 7399 with a soundtrack). Any comments and suggestions appreciated, I know this is a very out-there question but I think it would be interesting to try - I have a good deal to experiment with but not a high budget. Thanks!
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#2 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 06:14 PM

David,
Richard Tuohy here in Australia again. As I said previously I have a lot of this stock too. I have just shot a test roll at 6ASA and am sending it to PAC LAB for processing. I can let you know how it turns out if you like.
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#3 David Gottlieb

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 07:05 PM

David,
Richard Tuohy here in Australia again. As I said previously I have a lot of this stock too. I have just shot a test roll at 6ASA and am sending it to PAC LAB for processing. I can let you know how it turns out if you like.


That would be great: I can't shoot for a few weeks at least and I need to find a camera for it so I have plenty of time to hear your impressions on it! Sounds exciting; please keep me informed!! I'm excited to hear how it comes out. Thanks!
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 12:51 PM

Using 7399 as a camera film will likely require significant color correction filtration, in addition to the known very slow speed.

The other issue is that as a print film, it is likely perforated "long pitch" 1R-3000, which is not optimum for steadiness, especially if you use it as a printing original. Most 16mm camera films are "short pitch" 1R-2994.
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#5 Clive Tobin

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 10:38 PM

... Ektachrome 7399 Print Film.


I used to sometimes shoot on this stuff back when I got free short ends from the lab.

It is not a very exciting film, rather flat, grainy and colorless. Processed like original VNF it is about ASA 8, processed correctly as a print film with reduced first developer time it is roughly ASA 4.

A No. 85B filter does not quite correct it for daylight but two would be way too much. As a print film there is a lot more variation between batches than with real camera film. Normally the film lab comes up with a trim (basic filter) setting for each individual emulsion number batch.

The emulsion is not lubricated and may squeak, stick, be unsteady and even jam in the camera gate.

In comparison some of the other reversal print films (7387 RCP-II "Kodachrome", 7390 Ektachrome and 7361 B&W reversal) made excellent zero-budget filming stocks. These sadly are now all discontinued.
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