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files types and free software


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#1 Lukeo

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Posted 12 October 2005 - 12:41 PM

Hi all,

I realize this is a cinematography forum so I apologize in advance. My question concerns some stuff invloved in video editing. I'm just starting to experiment with video editing using windows movie maker on my pc, my question is what file type is best to use for editing? As soon as I connect my camcorder to my pc a video capturing wizard comes up and asks me what file type I want to capture. it starts with 3 options

"best quality for playback on my computer - recomended" "

digitial device format (DV-AVI) use if you plan to record your movie back to tape"

Other settings

video for pocket pc
high quality video (large or small)
video for local playback
video for LAN
video for broadband
video for isdn
video for dial up
DV-AVI (NTSC) ...I'm thinking this is the correct one
high quality video (NTSC)...which is the type I've used so far
video for local playback

I'm wondering which format is best for getting the best quality onto dvd, and what format should I be compressing it to when I burn the dvd. Also if you pick one format like ex. DV-AVI can you transfer that to a lower quality and vice versa?

Sorry for the big list of things, but I'm just a tad confused, If you also know of any good forums that could answer my question that'd be great.

In addition to this, Once I get comfortable with moviemaker I'd like to get a program with more options, Is there any free video editing programs that you guys know of, I've heard there are programs just as good as premiere or avid that can be obtained for free. Thanks very much for taking the time to read my post. i appreciate it.

Luke
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#2 Alvin Pingol

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 06:31 PM

>>DV-AVI (NTSC) ...I'm thinking this is the correct one

Use this. After importing, your footage should be DVSD compressed, 720x480 at 29.98fps, which is exactly what came out of the camera (hence, no loss in quality).

>>I'm wondering which format is best for getting the best quality onto dvd

Stick with DV compression throughout if you don't want to go uncompressed; if you're only cutting clips (i.e. no effects), the footage should not go through any recompression, which not only saves you from additional picture degredation, but also significantly speeds up render/export times. If there is a setting called "always recompress," or something similar, you'll want to make sure you disable it.

>>and what format should I be compressing it to when I burn the dvd.

DVD-compliant MPEG2, but this is only the beginning. Any competent DVD authoring software should take care of the rest, although there are several advanced settings you might want to tweak for best results.

>>Also if you pick one format like ex. DV-AVI can you transfer that to a lower quality

Yes

>>and vice versa?

Technically yes, but you won't be gaining anything. In fact, you're losing (in both hard disk space and image quality, as the already degraded image will go through another pass of compression).

>>Is there any free video editing programs that you guys know of

http://www.avid.com/freedv/index.asp

While I haven't used this myself, it surely looks, and most likely performs, better than Windows Movie Maker.

Hope this helps.
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#3 Lukeo

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 10:12 PM

Hey thanks a lot man, I appreciate it!

Luke
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