Jump to content


Photo

first time DOP for my film


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 ivan delenda

ivan delenda
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Director

Posted 12 October 2005 - 05:53 PM

hello ,,,
i made 2 films as a director, for my new film i cant pay a DOP, so i will do it myself...i ll be shooting during 2 monthes with 5 persones crew so it will be realy hot for me , to direct , to d o p, and to stay cool and not to loose ppl's trusts ,,,hoooo
i ll use XTR AAton super 16, ,,ok , i ll read well the camra notes, i have already " the american cinematographer manual " ,,but honestly i know nothing about film stock and filters,,,you see ? i have basics knowlge,i can charge the magazine, i can read light ,,,,,brrr,,i am loosing my nerves 3 monthes before the shooting.
is there anything to do in three monthes to learn more ? ok, i ll make tests with different stocks ,,,but is there books or films or webs or anything fot such situation ??

thanks
ivan
  • 0

#2 Mark Allen

Mark Allen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 591 posts
  • Director
  • Los Angeles

Posted 12 October 2005 - 06:09 PM

I'm sorry for not answering your question directly - but since you will certainly have enough glory and responsibility directing, have you thought about finding a 1st AC or gaffer who wants and is ready technically to move into the DP role and just have them act as DP. You still get to control the images as much as you like and they get a chance to get a DP'ing job and will bring all their knowledge to the table willingly and excitedly most likely.

Just a strategy thought. Unless none of your 5 people were going to be camera or lighting people.
  • 0

#3 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 13 October 2005 - 02:00 AM

hello ,,,
i made 2 films as a director, for my new film i cant pay a DOP, so i will do it myself...i ll be shooting during 2 monthes with 5 persones crew so it will be realy hot for me , to direct , to d o p, and to stay cool and not to loose ppl's trusts ,,,hoooo
i ll use XTR AAton super 16, ,,ok , i ll read well the camra notes, i have already " the american cinematographer manual " ,,but honestly i know nothing about film stock and filters,,,you see ? i have basics knowlge,i can charge the magazine, i can read light ,,,,,brrr,,i am loosing my nerves 3 monthes before the shooting.
is there anything to do in three monthes to learn more ? ok, i ll make tests with different stocks ,,,but is there books or films or webs or anything fot such situation ??

thanks
ivan


First of all what film stock are you going to use?
You have to learn specific details about how u will colour correct your lights or put a filter on the camera, in case you have an exterior and you are shooting with tungsten fil, or the opposite, interior with daylight film, or mixed light sources.
Do you know how to form the loop correctly for the Aaton?In case some of your crew forget?
Do some registration tests and lens tests, also stock tests.
That's for a start.

Dimitrios Koukas
  • 0

#4 ivan delenda

ivan delenda
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Director

Posted 13 October 2005 - 04:25 AM

hello,,
thanks for the advises,,,
i ll start tests as soon as possible for the film stock,,,and i ll be helped with someone who can dop with me.
i know the only way to learn is "to shoot",still is there any book or something to help me before shoooting ?

thanks
ivan
  • 0

#5 Tim Carroll

Tim Carroll
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2165 posts
  • Other
  • Chicago, Illinois

Posted 13 October 2005 - 06:33 AM

I got to agree with Mark on this one. The first two films my small production company made, I was the director and DP, and man was I over stretched. The last film we shot, I did not want to give up the DP position because I love creating the look, especially for this particular story, but it was the biggest project we had ever undertaken.

A DP friend of mine gave me great advice. He said to put an ad out for a gaffer with a truck, i.e. a gaffer with a truck full of lighting equipment. Here is how it worked. I hired him as a gaffer, but let him make suggestions on the lighting (and I really did listen to his suggestions). He set up the lights, I approved of every light set up, and I let him also be the camera operator after I showed him how I wanted each shot framed, again letting him make suggestions and really listening to them. We changed a few lighting set ups because I liked his idea better than mine. And then I gave him Cinematographer credit on the film. It was a win, win situation for both of us.

But you need to find the right person, someone who is willing to be the gaffer and camera operator, and won't try to take over the shoot. And it also helps to explain what you want to do right up front. We interviewed a number of candidates before we found one who was willing to work the way we wanted to work.

Best of luck with your project.

-Tim Carroll
  • 0

#6 Grainy

Grainy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Director

Posted 14 October 2005 - 12:52 PM

Hey there
I agree with the others but also think that there are ways to "do it all" yourself. The key thing will be to give yourself TIME to learn the camera. If you're scratchign your head in the middle of production, you'll blow your cool and it could be a downward spiral from there.
You may have to settle, as a newbie DOP, for less-than-hollywood setups. Use lots of natural light. Get a light meter and practice with a still camera! Shoot slides at 1/60 shutter speed with same film speed you intend to use in your aaton and see how they come out (this is a good close approximate).
STORYBOARD! There's some great free software here: http://www.frameforge.com/download.php
And here's a good book that will also give you an idea of what you'll need to do, bring to the shoot, and know MINIMUM:
The 16mm Camera Book by Underhall
http://www.amazon.co...uct/1570872856/

good luck
G
  • 0

#7 Mario C. Jackson

Mario C. Jackson
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 138 posts
  • Student

Posted 17 October 2005 - 11:10 AM

Well first I will say that I applaud you director. I think directors are great but dp is the way for me. I really do think that you are going to be stretched by playing dual roles. I would find a gaffer who would work for practically for free. If you can not find a good gaffer then get a fast film stock and go with that.
Mario C. Jackson
  • 0

#8 Benji Wade

Benji Wade
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • Student

Posted 20 October 2005 - 12:34 AM

I like what Dimitrios said. Find out as soon as possible what your locations will be like so you can determine what stocks to order. The light, its quality, its intensity, its temperature, all determine the best possible stocks and the speed of the film you choose will also determine your depth of field to a large degree (just as filters will).

I also like what Mark said. At this stage of the game, if you're two months from production, you might want to find an experienced AC or gaffer to help you along the way or you might end up in a nightmare within days.
  • 0


Opal

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

CineLab

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

The Slider

Wooden Camera