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#1 Steve Ford

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 01:59 PM

Hi Gang

I am going to be shooting some welding shots coming up and was wondering if there should be any concerns about damage to the camera other than staying away from flying sparks. Could the brightness of the welding do any harm to the chips?

Any input would be greatly appreciated

Steve
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#2 Simon Wyndham

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 03:59 PM

Hi Steve,

There was actually mention of somebody doing quite a lot of videoing of welding on another forum recently. I'll try and dig up the thread and post the link here. But what I do remember is that he said to be sure to put a good protective filter on the front of the lens. He said that he was amazed at how over time the sparks pock marked the filter quite dramatically. If that was the lens itself it could be expensive!

There shouldn't be any problem with the brightness of the welding. Just risks to the camera (and yourself) from flying sparks and other hazards.
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#3 david west

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 07:08 PM

welding is a very high source of UV light....

are you sure that perhaps an additional UV filter might not be a good idea??
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#4 Alvin Pingol

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 07:23 PM

Use the iris and ND filters over shutterspeed to dial down exposure. Because videocameras have no mechanical shutter, speeds like 1/10000 may record one ten-thousandths of a second's worth of exposure, but the light from the arc will still be hitting the CCD for the remaining 9999/10000th seconds [every second] and potentially cause damage.
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#5 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 08:01 PM

Need I mention this? Be carefull not to look directly at the arc even for a short time. Damage to your eyes may not be immediately apparent. A friend watched a welder for a while and woke up in the middle of the night in pain and unable to see. He had burned his retna.
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#6 Simon Wyndham

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 05:49 PM

That's videoing welding struck off my list of subjects to make programmes about then...
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#7 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 07:18 PM

A friend watched a welder for a while and woke up in the middle of the night in pain and unable to see. He had burned his retna.


It's called 'Arc-Eye' and it is quite extraordinarily painful. Your camera will be fine, as long as you follow the previous advice about using ND rather than shutter to knock down exposure. It's your eyes that are at risk. NEVER look at an arc with the naked eye, even for a few seconds. If you need to line up a shot, either get the welder to stop, or use a welders mask.
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