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B&W Backdrop, am I screwed?


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#1 Riku Naskali

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 11:16 PM

Hi, I have a short film shoot coming up and I just found out I'm getting a black & white backdrop behind my set window! Am I screwed?
I'm shooting on Kodak vision2 200t, super16. I think it's going to look horrible even if I hit it with a blue light or something like that...
We have some curtains partially blocking it, but really, would I be better of with just blowing out the backgroud?
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#2 Joseph White

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 11:45 PM

you aren't necessarily screwed - is it day or night interior? if its day, you can always blow out, although if production wanted to go through the trouble of having a backdrop of any kind, they might not want you to cook the windows. plus, you're shooting 7217 - which has a bit more latitude than the 7274 (discontinued for some reason...yet you can still get 5274 thankfully) so it'll be slightly tougher to blow it out. are you finishing on film or video? i'd be really careful if you're doing a photochemical finish, but if you are going to tape you can get away with maybe power windowing it out if you can't do it in the can.

if its night, try and see if they'll let the outside just go dark or if you're going to light the drop, maybe do sometimg other than blue - like try creating a sodium or mercury vapor streetlight look on the drop.

bottom line, you aren't necessarily screwed - just approach it as an oppurtunity to take a problem and create an interesting solution.
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#3 Riku Naskali

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 11:04 AM

It's a day interior and I wouldn't like to blow it out because it's a studio shoot! So I really can do anything I want with the window, excluding getting a decent backing...Have to brainstorm something beautiful out of this :)
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#4 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 11:45 AM

Years ago when I was an assistant I worked on a set where everything was done from B&W photos blown up to mural size. What I noticed when we saw rushes was that as long as there was a lot of action and forground movement one did not notice. If the camera sat static for a while giving the audience time to look around the set you would see it and it looked odd but at first you didn't know why. Its a bit like an old magic trick as long as the magician can keep the audiences attention they don't see what he is doing with his other hand. Also there is a psycological effect. Did you know that we have no color preception at the edges of our vision only in the middle? Yet you brain fills in the color so that we think we are seeing color everywhere. Keep the emphisis in the scene away from the window. Hopefully the actor doesn't have a line, "Look out the window!"
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