Jump to content


Photo

NEW- Super 8 film online- RAGE OF SILENCE


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#1 Justin Lovell

Justin Lovell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 14 October 2005 - 10:42 PM

Official web release today.

RAGE OF SILENCE
4 1/2 min samurai/kung fu flic.
tri-x, nizo pro, modified shutter angle, shot in camera, in sequence. No post editing allowed.

www.justinlovell.com > rage of silence > watch film.

lemme know what you think.

Posted Image


_________________
justin
frame discreet
www.justinlovell.com
  • 0

#2 John Adolfi

John Adolfi
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 342 posts
  • Producer
  • Fulton, N.Y.

Posted 15 October 2005 - 07:51 AM

Very nice job. Here is how I would have done it differently:
1.) Less side to side wiggling of camera, it became noticable.
2.) Two splices are showing.
3.) Color man living color!

Good job on the editing and composing the shots.
Good job on the continuity.

Sound wasn't bad either.
  • 0

#3 Justin Lovell

Justin Lovell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 15 October 2005 - 09:18 AM

Very nice job. Here is how I would have done it differently:
1.) Less side to side wiggling of camera, it became noticable.
2.) Two splices are showing.
3.) Color man living color!

Good job on the editing and composing the shots.
Good job on the continuity.

Sound wasn't bad either.


1) Yeah, I wanted to have a really jarring feel to it, but with the telephoto lens, I went a little too far with it. Live and learn. Especially in the snap zoom on the henchman who notices the girl.... really aggrivates me.

2) I like the splices. I could have cut them out, but I left them in to give it some more texture. You may not agree with that, asthetically but that's my choice. It just a constant reminder to me to not f' up next time. ;)

3) black and white. needed the extra exposure and that was the look I really wanted. Had considered giving it a slight warm sepia.. really slight, but didn't want to affect the film in post.

thanks for the kind words.

justin
frame discreet
www.justinlovell.com
  • 0

#4 Clampet15

Clampet15
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 15 October 2005 - 09:21 AM

Great job man.

I do agree that maybe a little less camera shaking. I thought that it was a good element during the intense fighting parts. But I felt like a was watching the blair witch project after a while. Good job though, I really liked the super 8 look for this piece.

-Brandon
  • 0

#5 Rod Otaviano

Rod Otaviano
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 185 posts
  • Other

Posted 15 October 2005 - 10:30 AM

Great job man.

I do agree that maybe a little less camera shaking. I thought that it was a good element during the intense fighting parts. But I felt like a was watching the blair witch project after a while. Good job though, I really liked the super 8 look for this piece.

-Brandon


I agree with Clampet15. A little less camera shaking would be nice. But yeah pretty well done. Congratulations. Images are great.

It reminded me a little bit of some scenes of 'Andrei Rublev' from Tarkovsky.
  • 0

#6 Christopher Heston

Christopher Heston
  • Guests

Posted 19 October 2005 - 07:53 PM

I to agree with the shakey camera movements. I do believe however, they might have worked had the camera been running at a high speed. Try running a super 8 at 54fps and then shake it for "intensity." You might get a very interesting result.

I love the close-ups - you seem to compose yuor super 8 stuff well close-up.

However, I think that so far your best film is stuntman. The shot you have of the guy running next to the two women is like I'm watching a bad copy of a 16mm film (for super 8) that's frickin' great. Nice job on the exposure and camera movement for that shot.

Not sure where you live, but I'd love to collaberate with you. I've been shooting super 8 for a while and I own a numerous amount of cameras (like the canon 310xl and the 814xls). If you want you could check out my super 8 short online. at

http://slugfilm.ucsc...eo.php?film=197

-Chris
  • 0

#7 andres victorero

andres victorero
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 412 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Spain

Posted 24 October 2005 - 06:47 AM

impressives images, looks very professional film. congrats :ph34r:
  • 0

#8 zrszach

zrszach
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 167 posts
  • Student
  • Olathe, Kansas

Posted 24 October 2005 - 06:43 PM

I also agree, a little less lateral movement?

The movement seemed too chaotic for some of the shots. It makes it kinda hard to watch.
  • 0

#9 Christopher Heston

Christopher Heston
  • Guests

Posted 24 October 2005 - 07:37 PM

I forgot one thing - GREAT JOB IN POST SOUND!! Very impressive.

-Chris
  • 0

#10 Justin Lovell

Justin Lovell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 30 October 2005 - 11:16 PM

I forgot one thing - GREAT JOB IN POST SOUND!! Very impressive.

-Chris



Thanks for the comments guys.

I'm in Toronto, dunno where you are. I'm looking to shoot another version of ROS, in a green forest for super 8 blowup eventually to 35mm. Gonna do all the seasons tackling some action films, kung fu style.

I'm really happy with my sound team, they've been great.

.... I agree with everyone about too much shakyness, but that's a lesson I learned when trying to push my boundaries. I would have shot some footage at 54fps, but the festival requirements didn't allow me to shoot more than 2 rolls, i'd have gone over for sure....
  • 0

#11 Raffinator

Raffinator
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 60 posts
  • Other

Posted 04 November 2005 - 11:41 PM

Really nice work Justin, interesting compositions, enjoyed the high contrast look -- immpressive, given the circumstances.

Didn't see that much grain for super 8. How did you transfer your footage?

Raffi
  • 0

#12 Justin Lovell

Justin Lovell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 05 November 2005 - 03:00 AM

Really nice work Justin, interesting compositions, enjoyed the high contrast look -- immpressive, given the circumstances.

Didn't see that much grain for super 8. How did you transfer your footage?

Raffi



Thanks again.

There actually is quite a bit of grain, web compression smoothed it out. The actual transfer is razor sharp, the grain looks stunning.... shot on tri-x for it to really punch through.

It's nice 'cause the grain isn't soft and obtrusive grain like you commonly have seen with shoddy transfers with the old ektachrome colour stock.

Oh.. and... it was transfered by frame discreet using a _modified_ Workprinter XP. You can get some excellent results with this unit, if you're willing to spend the bucks on building a proper computer capture setup, as well as investing in a solid camera to photograph your frames with.

Will be upgrading to a SNIPER PRO with a modified higher resolution camera in the new year.

justin
frame discreet
www.justinlovell.com
  • 0

#13 Raffinator

Raffinator
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 60 posts
  • Other

Posted 05 November 2005 - 09:36 PM

Oh.. and... it was transfered by frame discreet using a _modified_ Workprinter XP. You can get some excellent results with this unit, if you're willing to spend the bucks on building a proper computer capture setup, as well as investing in a solid camera to photograph your frames with.

Will be upgrading to a SNIPER PRO with a modified higher resolution camera in the new year.

justin


Thanks Justin.
Yeah, I figured that the small size of the web image would hide some of the grain.
I will be shooting a low budget project fairly soon that will use a fair amount of super 8, and though I am not planning on buying a workprinter or sniper, I may just send out my footage to them for the transfer. I have used Cinepost once in the past for super 8 telecine and was pleased with the results, but the prices for this outfit are a bit better. The project will be a short that has a mix of 16mm and Super 8, and I want the two gauges to look distinctivley different, the super 8 footage will be black and white, trix and plusx, and I want it to retain some of the grain that is inherant with super 8, but still look pleasing to the eye.

Raffi
  • 0

#14 Justin Lovell

Justin Lovell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 05 November 2005 - 10:39 PM

Thanks Justin.
Yeah, I figured that the small size of the web image would hide some of the grain.
I will be shooting a low budget project fairly soon that will use a fair amount of super 8, and though I am not planning on buying a workprinter or sniper, I may just send out my footage to them for the transfer. I have used Cinepost once in the past for super 8 telecine and was pleased with the results, but the prices for this outfit are a bit better. The project will be a short that has a mix of 16mm and Super 8, and I want the two gauges to look distinctivley different, the super 8 footage will be black and white, trix and plusx, and I want it to retain some of the grain that is inherant with super 8, but still look pleasing to the eye.

Raffi



Cool Sounds like you know what you want. More than anything, I'd recommend shooting a test with each roll, including the 16mm stock you are choosing, and check them all out side by side off the transfer.

I've found the plusx stock to be very slick, and superior to trix for 'lack of grain'... plusx has what is often referred to as a 'velvety' feel, smooth. Tri-x will defineatly be a harsher more contrasty look from the 16mm.

Again, do a test, plusx may be a better way to go, when you actually compare it to the 16mm stock that you're choosing. Don't forget that you'll be loosing a few stops shooting the slower plusx too, so any indoor scenes will need more light, and any slo-mo or shutter angle 'tricks' will need more light/exposure.

all the best,
  • 0

#15 Bill Totolo

Bill Totolo
  • Sustaining Members
  • 698 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 14 October 2006 - 02:39 AM

That was awesome, I love the tracking shot.
Shame about the hair in the gait but whatta' ya gonna do?
I like the shutter angle, how'd you simulate the effect of a 30 degree shutter (as posted on your website)?
  • 0

#16 Andrew Means

Andrew Means
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 88 posts
  • Other

Posted 14 October 2006 - 03:20 PM

Haha, yeah that tracking shot (how'd you do that, by the way?) and the shot where the guy with the rice hat zips away look like some anime I've seen. Excellent work. Good sound too...
  • 0

#17 Tankerplot

Tankerplot

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Other

Posted 14 October 2006 - 03:39 PM

Great effort! I particularly liked the foley artist's recreation of classic dubbed B-movies... All in all possibly the best use of 2 rolls of B&w SUPER 8 I've ever seen, and the hair in the gate - well, it all adds to the feel as far as I see it.
  • 0

#18 Michael Ryan

Michael Ryan
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 182 posts
  • Other
  • Toronto, Canada via Huntington Beach, California

Posted 14 October 2006 - 04:31 PM

Hello Justin,

Really outstanding work. I have to disagree with some of the others, I really liked the use of that SAVING PRIVATE RYAN stutter look of the camera and movement. I think it added a lot to the film.

Loved the black and white as well. Sound was really fantastic. When you consider that this was all edited "in camera" that makes it all the more remarkable.

In my opinion, Justin is one of the best Super-8 filmmakers out there. His films are always first rate and really they are setting the standard as to what can be done on Super 8.

Transfer is also excellent.

Justin, keep writing, keep making films!

Mike
  • 0

#19 Justin Lovell

Justin Lovell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 15 October 2006 - 01:41 AM

That was awesome, I love the tracking shot.
Shame about the hair in the gait but whatta' ya gonna do?
I like the shutter angle, how'd you simulate the effect of a 30 degree shutter (as posted on your website)?


Thanks Bill, I appreciate the kind words.

I used my CSST... coffee stir stick technique. Whereas you take a wooden coffee stir stick, break it in half, then tape it together (so it is nice an wide), then wedge it into the the slider for the variable shutter (on the NIZO 800 or Pro model) to hold it in place.

All great ideas start from stupid ideas.

:huh:
  • 0

#20 Justin Lovell

Justin Lovell
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Toronto

Posted 15 October 2006 - 02:02 AM

Thanks, Michael, Andrew and all the other posters, you guys are all really kind.

re: tracking shot & dolly shot...
One of them was done on a dolly on pipes, the other was done on an old school sled, I rode it like a snowboard and someone pulled me along from the front. We packed down a track from a few tests runs then let 'er rip. It was cool 'cause it just started to snow a little when we did that shot. It's real pretty when you get a chance to shoot falling water or snow with small shutter angles.
  • 0


Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineTape

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

The Slider

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

The Slider

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Opal

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Willys Widgets