Jump to content


Photo

SDX-900 compared to Sony DVW-790


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Tom Bays

Tom Bays
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 157 posts
  • Producer
  • Cincinnati, Ohio

Posted 18 October 2005 - 04:15 PM

We are still staying in the SD format for a while until we start inserting commercials in HD. I was wondering how the quality level of the 900 compares to that of the 790. I like the quality of the 790 and i hate to part with it, but i'm told i have to. I will more than likely not shoot in 16 x 9 for a while.
  • 0

#2 Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Portland, OR

Posted 18 October 2005 - 05:39 PM

Hi-

I've shot with both cameras, but never compared them side-by-side- I have to say that i can't imagine you'd be disappointed with the quality of the 900, it's really first-rate, and a bit more versatile camera. It seemed to me not quite as cumbersome or heavy as the 790. However, the menus of the 900 don't seem very intuitive to me (on my first 900 shoot, it took me, a second operator who had used the camera on several other shoots, and two B&S rental techs *with the instruction manual* just to figure out how to read information to and from the little set-up card...) It does get easier though.

I'd love to have someone force a 900 on me!
  • 0

#3 Tom Bays

Tom Bays
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 157 posts
  • Producer
  • Cincinnati, Ohio

Posted 18 October 2005 - 06:34 PM

Hi-

I've shot with both cameras, but never compared them side-by-side- I have to say that i can't imagine you'd be disappointed with the quality of the 900, it's really first-rate, and a bit more versatile camera. It seemed to me not quite as cumbersome or heavy as the 790. However, the menus of the 900 don't seem very intuitive to me (on my first 900 shoot, it took me, a second operator who had used the camera on several other shoots, and two B&S rental techs *with the instruction manual* just to figure out how to read information to and from the little set-up card...) It does get easier though.

I'd love to have someone force a 900 on me!


The whole pushing the button in when turning the camera on to get all the menus can throw you if you don't know about it.

Is the film look (i understand lighting) decent without expensive lenses?
  • 0

#4 Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 873 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Portland, OR

Posted 19 October 2005 - 10:05 AM

24fps on the camera looks great, as does 30fps (progressive). I did a multi-camera cooking show and we used 24p to give it a higher-end look, mostly taking away the game-show live look of 60i video. I thought the 30p also did this effectively, but we went with 24 which looked to me like a very clean, stable and dirt-free telecine from film.

you'll love it-
  • 0

#5 Michael Nash

Michael Nash
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3330 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Pasadena, CA

Posted 19 October 2005 - 03:51 PM

I've shot quite a bit with both, and can say you will not be disappointed with the SDX. Even though I believe the pixel count is technically less than that of the Sony, the picture is astounding. So clean, so pure. Yes, the Panasonic is lighter.

You can read my comments about it in the "In Production" forum under "Loading Zone."
  • 0

#6 Tom Bays

Tom Bays
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 157 posts
  • Producer
  • Cincinnati, Ohio

Posted 02 November 2005 - 04:46 PM

I've shot quite a bit with both, and can say you will not be disappointed with the SDX. Even though I believe the pixel count is technically less than that of the Sony, the picture is astounding. So clean, so pure. Yes, the Panasonic is lighter.

You can read my comments about it in the "In Production" forum under "Loading Zone."


How long do you think this will remain a viable camera? Will it hold up over time?
  • 0


Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

CineTape

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets