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Lighting from Lowes or Home Depot


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#1 Micah Garner

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 07:05 PM

Does anyone know if it is possible to effectively use extremely cheap lighting that could be bought at Lowes or Home Depot? I'm just looking for the cheapest lighting solution possible, that doesn't have to work great, but can get the job done.
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#2 Tim Tyler

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 07:34 PM

Do a search in this 'Lighting' forum for 'depot'.
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#3 Scott Fritzshall

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 10:55 PM

It's certainly possible. They're obviously not as good, but they get the job done. Be sure you've got some black wrap/heavy aluminum foil, and something to act as flags and shape the light for you.
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#4 Matt Lazzarini

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 11:48 AM

There are worklights that range from 150w to 1,000 watts at Home Depot. Those are good, but can be a bit warm. Obviously as mentioned get black wrap and flags/foamcore to control and shape it.

At Home Depot tell them you want to make a 4x4 frame with the lightest metal or some other heat-resistant material. Ask them what you need and how to do it. Build it, and throw some diffusion onto it. Go to a rental house and ask very nicely if you can slice off the gels from the frames that were left on on past shoots. Usually if its a slow day and they're in a giving mood they'll let you. Do not abuse this privilege.

Home Depot also sells fluorescent worklights - they usually come in 2' or 4' by 1 tube configurations. These are quite useful, though unfortunately not every brand lists the color temp of the bulb and you usually cannot switch them out for a 3200 or 5000k bulb. They also sell four foot by 2 tube housings with a 3 prong household plug (meaning the ballast is already in the housing and no special wiring is needed). If you're handy you can rig this to some plesti-plastic from an art supply store and attach a mount to the back of said plastic, and presto - a 'kinda' kinoflow, also called ghetto flows or cheapo-flows.

Make a trip to IKEA - I just picked up 2 small china balls (30cm each), 1 large china ball (60cm), three wiring connectors, and three bulbs for less than $60 CDN, which works out to something like $7.50 US :P

Edited by blastdoors, 20 October 2005 - 11:52 AM.

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#5 Bill Totolo

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 01:59 PM

I've used the 500w quartz worklights a lot. I usually try to shoot them through or bounce them off light panels or some kind of diffusion. They're not bad once you control them a little bit.
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