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Tow dolly instead of process trailer?


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#1 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 04:44 PM

Anyone have experience using a tow dolly on the streets? It looks like it would be a lot less obtrusive than a 2 lane wide process trailer, but still reasonably flexible, and it would free up the actors from having to drive. I'd be using it with a conventional hood mount and hostess tray. Rigid towing is something else I'm considering. Must check regs.


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#2 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 20 October 2005 - 05:01 PM

don't tell me the road was open to the traffic by the time this still was taken?
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#3 Bob Hayes

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Posted 21 October 2005 - 02:45 AM

Tow dollies work pretty well. However, it is hard to find them that are low enough. The tow dollies used by tow companies are pretty high making the front end of the angled up. Enough to be a problem. The tow dollies made for film word are exceptionally low and actually often drag along the highway
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#4 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 21 October 2005 - 03:05 AM

I intend to build one for the purpose, so I can make it low. Maybe even pull the front wheels off the car. Don't worry I'll get it engineer stamped. I just picked that still off the Shotmaker site. No riding a crane on the back of a truck for me oh no.
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#5 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 21 October 2005 - 04:11 AM

I've used a thing called an 'A-Frame' for towing car before. It attaches to the front axle of the car (I think) and pulls and steers from there. Because the wheel are still on the ground, there are no problems with strange perspectives. If you're using it on a car with an auto gearbox, it must be in neutral (probably the best bet in any case).
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#6 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 03:55 PM

I've used tow dolly's before. They're not as convenient as an actual process trailer, but it sounds like you're just hardmounting anyway, so it should be fine. I actually did some fun stuff with a tow dolly and a technocrane a few years back. It was fun doing 270 degree moves around a moving car and actually seeing the ground at certain points.
I don't think you need to build your own dolly. I think you'll probably be able to rent one for much cheaper, and you won't have to worry about being held responsible if there is a problem with it.
Good luck.
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Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Opal

CineLab

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc