Jump to content


Photo

need help with nizo


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 bucca

bucca

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Student

Posted 21 October 2005 - 08:01 PM

Hi,
I recently bought my first super 8 camera, a nizo s560. I shot one roll of kodachrome 40 with it, and it turned out alright. Now that they've discontinued that stock, however, I was going to purchase the new ektachrome, or possibly the tri-x or plus-x b/w stocks, to try to them out.

I know that the camera reads the ASA using the notch on the cartridge, but I have no way of knowing if the camera can read all cartridge notches. Since its an old camera, perhaps it won't register the newer stock speeds? I'm just concerned because I am reliant on the internal light meter until I can get some money together for a decent meter. Can anyone let me know what speeds the Nizo will read, or if there is a way I can find out? I don't have the manual for the camera, so if someone can direct me to a site where I could find an english language manual for the nizo, that would also be excellent.

I like the camera so far, seems like a nice middle of the road camera, good to start off with. Please advise as to how to prepare to shoot other stocks. Thank you so much!
  • 0

#2 Alessandro Machi

Alessandro Machi
  • Sustaining Members
  • 3318 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 22 October 2005 - 01:14 PM

Since we can pretty much presume that Kodachrome 40 will read correctly in any Super-8 camera ever made, always keep one cartridge on hand, for as long you plan to have a super-8 camera and even if you plan to get rid of one and get one later.

You can test the compatibility of any cartridge to your camera's automatic metering system by first putting in the Kodachrome 40 cartridge and taking an F-stop reading, then switching out the cartridge with new stock and seeing how much the auto exposure meter's f-stop setting changes.

Just make sure of a couple of things. Makes sure the lighting doesn't change in the time it takes to switch out the K-40 with the newer cartridge, and two, make sure you don't get a "wide open" f-stop reading with the K-40 because you don't really know if the K-40 is at wide open or needs even more light. Also, if it's super bright outside and your k-40 somehow manages to read over F-11, then it's also possible that a more sensitive film stock might completely "stop-down" your camera and you won't be able to accurately assess the f-stop difference between the two cartridges

You can probably figure that if you can get your Kodachrome cartridge to read between F2.0 and an F 8.0-11.00 split, you should be able to verify how different cartridges respond to the auto meter in your camera comparing the automatic exposure readings between the Kodachrome 40 and the new stock of choice.
  • 0


Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

The Slider

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Technodolly

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Opal

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies