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Loading 400 foot core loads from a newbie


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 09:10 PM

All,
I been shooting 16 for a while, but with 100 foot daylight rolls. However, since I'm going to be out in teh field with my new sixteen (an eclair npr), I'm planning to shoot with a 400 load, for ease and convenience. To reign myself in, I've limited myself to one roll so I don't have to worry about changing loads in the field. That said, I'm still wondering if there are any tips, or warnings you all could offer when handling 400ft core loads. I mean, I know to load/unload them in total dark, but that's about it. What about the danger of core drop out? I'd love to hear any tips!
Thanks,
Best,
BR
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#2 Mike Vlack

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 12:01 AM

Squeeze the roll a bit.

Push the actual plastic core onto the adaptor, never push the film.

You'll get confident with it quickly, it isn't difficult (except for maybe the Aaton 35-III which takes a bit of practice).

At first take your time and concentrate. You can speed up when you have loaded more.
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#3 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 12:50 AM

All,
I been shooting 16 for a while, but with 100 foot daylight rolls. However, since I'm going to be out in teh field with my new sixteen (an eclair npr), I'm planning to shoot with a 400 load, for ease and convenience. To reign myself in, I've limited myself to one roll so I don't have to worry about changing loads in the field. That said, I'm still wondering if there are any tips, or warnings you all could offer when handling 400ft core loads. I mean, I know to load/unload them in total dark, but that's about it. What about the danger of core drop out? I'd love to hear any tips!
Thanks,
Best,
BR


Hello.
Do the procedure many times, and the sprockets threading in the magazine, with an allready developed negative.
U will be sure that u have the loop correctly and all the threading.
So try it with the lids open and use allready developed negative (or positive better).
Do the loading and unloading in bright light with allready developed film.
By doing this, you will have visualise the procedure for the dark room this way.
In case that u will stuck with anything, with your hands in the bag, ask someone to bring you an empty magazine to see it open and figure out what is going on.
Most cameras take the virgin negative operator's side (Left) and take-up side is right side.(from operator's view always).
There will be no problem if you have a roll-out, it's just a bit tricky in the NPR to cut it, if you have used let's say 320 ft of stock, and u want to save the other 80ft. for another day.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#4 Andy Sparaco SOC

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 08:53 AM

Do your magazines have collapsical cores? this makes an unload easy. The NPR had a very specific number of frames for the "pass thru" on to the take up side- 13 or 15 frames?. You also might cut across the sprocket hole so the leading edge of the frame can slide up to and contact with the drive sprocket. Did you know that the NPR has an expedition motor? -a hand cranked clock work motor.
and the magazines can be removed and inserted while the camera is running.

If you look inside the lens mount you will see the leading edge of the variable shutter which all NPR's have . A variable shutter is uncommon in 16mm cameras and most modern Arri and Aaton don't have one. Costs a bunch to have one installed on an Arri SR.

Les Boscher in England can update the two lens mounts to PL and "other" like Nikon or cannon or beter yet Leica R

NPR was a great camera-at times I wish I still had one.
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