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Which super 8 film?


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#1 gavin

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 04:53 AM

Hey there,
Ive just dug out my dads old super 8 to shoot on two commisions. Ive plenty of experience on 16mm but nothing on super 8. im aware of the issues of under exposure so i want to ask two simple questions...

i) what is the best colour film for an indoor shoot under tungstan (potentially low light)

ii) what is the best colour film for daylight shoot, (either natural light or daylight temperature bulbs)

Also, do you guys use light meters to get your f stops or put the camera on manual ap?

I look forward to hearing the wisdom,

Gavin
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 07:45 AM

Hey there,
Ive just dug out my dads old super 8 to shoot on two commisions. Ive plenty of experience on 16mm but nothing on super 8. im aware of the issues of under exposure so i want to ask two simple questions...

i) what is the best colour film for an indoor shoot under tungstan (potentially low light)

ii) what is the best colour film for daylight shoot, (either natural light or daylight temperature bulbs)

Also, do you guys use light meters to get your f stops or put the camera on manual ap?

I look forward to hearing the wisdom,

Gavin

For indoor use use 7218. If you want to minimize grain, rate it at 400. For outdoor there are many choices. The new ektachrome comes to mind. or you can shoot 7217. You can still lay your hands on some kodachrome, do that. It will have the finest grain and the most color saturation. An external meter is always best, although some of the built in meters work very well. What kind of camera are you going to shoot with?


chris


:)
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#3 gavin

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 09:18 AM

For indoor use use 7218. If you want to minimize grain, rate it at 400. For outdoor there are many choices. The new ektachrome comes to mind. or you can shoot 7217. You can still lay your hands on some kodachrome, do that. It will have the finest grain and the most color saturation. An external meter is always best, although some of the built in meters work very well. What kind of camera are you going to shoot with?
chris
:)



Ive got a reasonably good quality 70's Chinon, its 8mm-56mm i think. Its compatible with a large selection of ASA's which is helpful. Thanks for your reply. I saw the kodachrome 40 today but ended up ordering some of the new ektachrome 64T. I figured because i was shooting under tungstan that it would be appropriate stock and also wanted that bit of extra speed as getting enough light will probably be an issue. I also wanted to save cash by going for a reversal film so i dont have to get it put onto positive, (if thats the correct terminology).

I was suprised to find that the faster the film, the grainier, i guess im gonna have to live with that choice now!! I think i will follow your advice and get an external light meter, dont trust the onboard one, any suggestions ?
Also, what do you mean by 'rating the film at 400'? is that something you do when it gets developed..? Hope you have the time to answer all the rudimentry questions!!!

cheers, Gavin
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 10:10 AM

Definitely shoot a test cartridge beforehand.

The quickest way to get up to speed on exposing film properly is to use the Super-8 camera as a spot meter.
Zoom in to the area of most importance in your frame and take a reading. Then decide if what you metered reflected brighter than 18% gray, equivalent o 18% gray, or less than 18% gray.

For instance, if you zoom into a causcasian face, the meter will probably overreact, so you'll probably want to overexpose that auto reading by 1/2 to 1 f-stop. Another technique is to frame the area of greast contrast in your scene and that will give your range of choice, then simply choose the reading that favors what matters most to you in the scene, or split the difference.

The cool thing about either method is even if your results are not perfect, as long as they are consistent you can than add a slight modification to the method on the next cartridge.

If you want to be sure your camera is reading the cartridge ASA correctly, always have a "spare" K-40 cartridge available so that you can compare sensitivity versus ASA of the film with a known constant, the K-40, with the other film cartridge.
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#5 A.Oliver

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 10:11 AM

Hi, will you be projecting your results or transferring to video??? If going straight to tape i would advise using neg film 200t and for low lite 500t. If you require the finished film on film, then k40 is the best option, then this new 64t stock, though low lite shots will be a problem. Test that chinon with a roll of k40 in various situations before starting your project. Try and lock the exposure when possible ( quite a few members had chinon cameras at our local cine club years ago, i remember they nearly always underexposed and the auto iris shut down with any hint of sky in the scene). First task is to test that camera. Good Luck
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#6 gavin

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 05:19 AM

Try and lock the exposure when possible ( quite a few members had chinon cameras at our local cine club years ago, i remember they nearly always underexposed and the auto iris shut down with any hint of sky in the scene). First task is to test that camera. Good Luck



yeh, going to telecine it myself, so will go for the 64t i think to get that extra bit of speed in the low light. We are gonna light it up like fireworks night on location to get this film exposed. I hope this chinon behaves its self, ive seen some footage my dad shot in the 70s on it and it seemed pretty stable...heres hoping. Thanks for your advice, much appreciated

The cool thing about either method is even if your results are not perfect, as long as they are consistent you can than add a slight modification to the method on the next cartridge.

If you want to be sure your camera is reading the cartridge ASA correctly, always have a "spare" K-40 cartridge available so that you can compare sensitivity versus ASA of the film with a known constant, the K-40, with the other film cartridge.



I will give that a bash, clever clever. However, i had my chinon's light metre checked yesterday and apparently its underexposing 2.5 stops!!! (the reason for this is that its now illegal to sell mercury batteries and so i have to put a battery in the camera that is close to the origanal but power surges the light meter a bit, bugger)........So thinking about bying a seperate light meter, its gotta make life better....

will post the results of this 64t stock, doing tests this weekend then shooting a couple of weeks down the line.

cheers for the wisdom, gavin
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#7 John Hyde

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 09:51 PM

I found the new 64T colorful and quite good for documentry or dream sequences. The K-40 also has similar appearence. Heavy contrast and super saturated color make these films good for special applications. I would even consider these films for a feature film if the look called for it.

The 200T Vision 2 super 8 is the best all around film for natural looks. The closest thing going for a 16mm look.

I would shoot the 200T Vision 2 indoors with reasonable lighting. Again, I would shoot the 200T outdoors taking care not to overexpose the film too much.
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Abel Cine

Visual Products

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Tai Audio

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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

CineLab

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider