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Shooting Negative stocks


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#1 Ronney Ross

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 03:16 PM

I am considering putting together a short script that I would like to shoot next year to apply to some film festivals not sure to shoot video or film for the idea I feel film will be better I will have to shoot Super 8 if I go the film route but the 5000 dollars question is how to get the best results if shooting a kodak V200 or V500 shot overexpose with a pro=telecine or workprinter seeking to get an output on minidv maybe some sort of HD if I hire out the editing.

thanks in advance
Ronney Ross

P.S. trying to keep from having a 70's tone look which most S8 I have seen not all has that look.
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#2 Will Montgomery

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 05:02 PM

The Vision2 200T when exposed properly will look great. If the lighting is good or you're shooting outdoors, I think it can approach 16mm in quality. The look of the film is much different than any reversal you've seen so its much less "70's" now.

Are you looking at film festivals or video festivals? There will be a big difference if you are editing with Final Cut or Avid vs. actually cutting film...

Bonofilms has a good HD option, but even though their probably the least expensive, its still not cheap. They have a link on the right ad section.

Establish a budget and work from there. You'll be very happy with Vision2 in Super 8, but working with film is expensive even in Super 8. Cinepost in Atlanta is a good Telecine option and their colorists work well with that stock.

Also keep in mind how you will handle audio since you'll need a quiet Super 8 camera and have to record sound separately.
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#3 Ronney Ross

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 06:33 PM

Thanks will I understand that shooting film isn't cheap that Why I am not sure about shooting it Super 8 at all especially since this will be my first time out the gate trying to actually put together from start to finish a short between 15-30 min. I have spoken to the guy at cinepost before and quoted my at rate which seems to be reasonable so if I go the film route they are close enough to me that they may be who I would work with.
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#4 Will Montgomery

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 08:44 PM

I'd suggest picking up a Super 8 camera and shooting a few rolls to get the hang of it, but you might be better off doing the short with a rented DigiBeta cam or even a good 3 chip miniDV if its you're first project... Much easier to work with and easier to get good results quickly. Dialog is easier to work with that way too.

Either way, make sure you check out those negative stocks, they look great.
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#5 andres victorero

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 10:55 AM

I´m agree with Will Montgomery the miniDV is easier and more less expensive if you do mistakes. You can shoot with a cheap miniDV and look the mistakes, when you are sure, shoot in S8, you save a lot of money.

good luck
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#6 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 12:42 PM

I agree about testing the waters first and the mini-dv is a good idea.

You can also use a hybrid approach in which you make a much shorter Super-8 project which will still expose you to almost everything that can go wrong on a longer project, plus you get the added benefit of establishing a look that you like.

Make sure you have to edit dialogue as most films that fail end up having soundtracks that just don't work.

A very short Super-8 project, 1-2 minutes in length, is what I would recommend, and don't be discouraged if you aren't happy with the result, as long as you learn what it is that you did incorrectly.
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#7 Matt Wells

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Posted 28 October 2005 - 05:10 PM

One of the advantages of the negative stocks is the massive latitude - miles ahead of any video format and what any TV can handle.

Because of this it is very easy to obtain a high quality result from these emulsions with very basic lighting.

If it is your first time you should definitely attend the transfer to video and then you can grade each shot wn get the look you want - and correct any mistakes!

Matt
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#8 Justin Lovell

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 11:23 PM

One of the advantages of the negative stocks is the massive latitude - miles ahead of any video format and what any TV can handle.

Because of this it is very easy to obtain a high quality result from these emulsions with very basic lighting.

If it is your first time you should definitely attend the transfer to video and then you can grade each shot wn get the look you want - and correct any mistakes!

Matt



If you're looking for another option for neg telecine, I can do it for you. Also the local lab here in toronto NIAGARA CUSTOM LAB (google 'em) can process the neg stocks for $20.00cdn/cart.
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#9 Ronney Ross

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 09:38 PM

Thanks for the added info guys, Justin I will be looking you up hopefully kinda soon.

-ronney ross
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#10 Chris Burke

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 05:11 PM

Thanks for the added info guys, Justin I will be looking you up hopefully kinda soon.

-ronney ross



Why not make a kick ass 5 minute film shot on 7217? www.cinelab.com will develope for $15.00 US per cart. They will also do a telecine via a Rank straight to a hard drive as an uncompressed file. Not sure if the said file would be 8 bit or 10, but I think they charge 18¢ per foot for a scene to scene. Give them a call, they are very willing to work with you on a package. If your computer can't deal with the uncompressed data, it is huge, just make offline clips and edit with those. When you are ready for the festival circuit and have been accepted into some really big ones. Then you spend the money, I bet some one would do it for $500, and get an online. If you have a reallyl tight edit and sound mix, you could most likely find some post haus that might squeeze you in somewhere for cheap. They could do a really good "best light" when laying it to DigiBeta. Then you will have an extremely sexy little film with a look like no other. If you can at all, shoot on film.
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#11 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 06:57 PM

Here are a few stills of super 8 7217 I had done by Flying Spot. I had the colorist punch up the saturation and contrast just a tad.. added a little more contrast to the flower myself.

Posted Image

Posted Image
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#12 andres victorero

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 07:15 AM

Here are a few stills of super 8 7217 I had done by Flying Spot. I had the colorist punch up the saturation and contrast just a tad.. added a little more contrast to the flower myself.



great images, very sharp and i like the colour too

definitely, shoot with V 200T (and telecine) is the best way to archive sharp and great images of S8 film, what do you think?

Edited by andres victorero, 02 November 2005 - 07:22 AM.

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