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dead pixel on the f900?


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#1 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 09:12 PM

I was ACing on an f900 shoot this past weekend and we noticed what looks like a dead pixel in the frame. After troubleshooting, it turned out to be an issue with the camera itself and not the monitor. Considering I completely babied this [very new] camera the entire time, what could have possibly caused this- is it some sort of manufacturing defect? :(

Edit: I should specify that I am pretty new to this camera and it was a student shoot.

Edited by SpikeyAnnie, 25 October 2005 - 09:17 PM.

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#2 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 25 October 2005 - 11:25 PM

I haven't used a f900 myself, regrets, but a dead pixel can often be "fixed" in many pro video cameras by performing multiple automatic black balance operations (usually 3 times in a row).

For example, refer to Richard Hewitt's related post over on creativeCOW,net:
http://forums.creati...5&postid=854804

I searched the f900 user manual and don't see a reference to dead pixels or a solution, so if the above doesn't address the issue in your f900 you might contact Sony tech support -- unless someone else here has a better suggestion or more complete information.

Let us know whether or not the above addresses your issue.

All the best,

- Peter DeCrescenzo
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 03:30 AM

Hi,

I'm curious at to what you think you could possibly have done to it no matter how careless you were that would have caused a pixel to die!

Be assured, if you had a pixel die on you spontaneously during the shoot (which is entirely possible; they have to go at some point) there's nothing you could have done to either cause or prevent it. More likely you simply missed it at the checkout.

Phil
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#4 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 05:46 AM

The only way I've ever heard to "fix" a dead pixel in the field is to do the multiple black balance thing. If that doesn't do it, it needs to go back to the rental house where they'll be able to fix it. It's a very common problem though, so nothing to really worry about.
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#5 Mike Brennan

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Posted 26 October 2005 - 06:32 PM

The only way I've ever heard to "fix" a dead pixel in the field is to do the multiple black balance thing. If that doesn't do it, it needs to go back to the rental house where they'll be able to fix it. It's a very common problem though, so nothing to really worry about.


You may need to activate the auto pixel correction circuits many times (like a dozen) before it works.



Mike Brennan
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#6 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 12:36 AM

This is going to make me sound like such a slacker but I actually was not there for checkout; I was at Nine Inch Nails! :unsure: It's a long story and it's not nearly as irresponsible of me as it sounds. Anyway, thanks for the answers, I'll look into that link and the black balance solution as well and see if I come up with anything.
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#7 Elhanan Matos

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 01:58 AM

You know if this was 1999 or 2000 and Nine inch Nails were on the Fragility tour then this would be totally excusable, but it's not, and "With Teeth" was terrible, so... anyways... Checking for pixels is pretty easy, all that you need to do is make sure you let the camera warm up for about thirty minutes or so, set the gain to 0db, shut off the lights and check for any lit pixels on 24 inch monitor, then set it to +3db and check again. Usually you wont see them come up until you get to about +6db and they are usually blue pixels that pop up first. Also make sure you check all this at 24p, they tend to light up more often at 24p rather than 60i.

If you do find any then make sure the APR (automatic pixel restoration) is on (this is in the service menu), and then hit the auto black balance switch, MAKE SURE the lens cap is on or the iris is closed all the way down. If the APR is on you will notice the screen flash during the ABB. The APR will only scan for dead pixels one color at a time, and for some reason it doesnt seem to do it in any order, so if the pixel doesnt dissapear the first time do it about five more times.

If the pixel doesn't go away after all the that then send the camera back, its no longer your problem (unless you own the camera).
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#8 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 03:21 AM

Hi,
I have used the F900 many times (it seems more than almost any other camera) and many times I have gotten at least one dead or 'lit' pixel as they are also sometimes reffered to. I have always been able to get rid of them using the black balance (as someone else said the key is having the lens capped and the iris closed).
Sometimes they dissapear on the first few black balances, but one time it letterally took 25 times for it to get rid of the pixel. If you dont have a good sized HD monitor, a good way to find them is to close the iris/cap the lens, and turn the viewfinder peaking all the way up and the dead pixel will usually glow on the black screen. This dead pixel phenomenon seems to occur more when the camera gets very hot from being used non-stop for long periods.
Cheers.
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#9 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 03:38 PM

25 times?! Wow...

Well I don't own the camera, the school does. We are going to have students black-balance it 4 times and if it doesn't go away after that, to contact engineering. Except me, I'll probably stand there patiently black-balancing for as long as it takes because that's just how stubborn I am. Thank you all for your advice. And "With Teeth" is a terrible album but they played some of their old stuff too so it was a worthwhile experience...!
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#10 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 03:42 PM

Hi,

I think this has relevance to the British film schools debate - this school, this fairly unremarkable American college, owns an F900, and presumably the postproduction equipment to go with it. I believe LFS have one SR2 which is always booked up as it's the only half-modern camera they own.

Ms. Wengenroth is being educated for the actual market that exists in the world outside college. The average LFS student is being educated in how a bunch of jumper-wearing old farts wish it were still being done!

Phil
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#11 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 04:48 PM

We also have... :ahem: 25 bolexes, 7 16mm SRIIs and 3 super-16mm SRIIs, 6 Arriflex S/Bs, 1 Varicam, 2 F900s, 20? DVX-100As, 20? GL-1s, 3 Aaton XTR-Prods, 6 SDX900s, 6 DVCPRO 610 (DVCPro 25)...uh, I think that's it for cameras. B) And we have a Panaflex GII on loan for a year chillin in the back room right now. I am seriously not trying to brag, I just thought you guys might be curious! (and envious!)
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#12 Nathan Milford

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 06:37 PM

FYI, pixel compesating in your school's Varicam's is straightforward and easy. In the engineering menu you can point crosshairs at the damn things, pick which chip thier on and then 'delete' the pixel.
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#13 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 06:50 PM

Hi,

You're actually better equipped than most UK production companies, which I suppose shouldn't really surprise me.

Christ, we really are becoming a third-world country over here.

Phil
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#14 Elhanan Matos

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 05:40 AM

I was about to apply to SCAD myself a few years ago, but then the school changed ownership or something, I guess the president lost the school over a divorce or something, and a friend of mine in Savannah told me it wasn't what it used to be. But I guess it's not that bad if they have all that equipment lying around.
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#15 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 08:04 AM

Yeah, the school has changed dramatically even since I got here in 2001. Especially the film & television program which used to be only video. And our amount of equipment has skyrocketed; granted we've always had good stuff but it has only gotten better. The program is definitely getting up there. Unfortunately some of the students still make poop films because we allow EVERYONE to make a senior project or thesis movie, instead of being selective about which scripts get selected, so that's kinda interesting. Oh well, I'm done in 3 weeks so what do I care!
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#16 Patrick Neary

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 10:00 AM

Hi,

You're actually better equipped than most UK production companies, which I suppose shouldn't really surprise me.

Christ, we really are becoming a third-world country over here.

Phil


Don't feel bad, Phil- most US prod. companies (and a number of rental houses i can think of) aren't set up that well either...
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#17 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 12:11 PM

Hi,

So, Annie, what're you going to do in three weeks?

Do the squalid apartment share thing in LA until it all takes off?

Snarf.

Phil
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#18 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 05:51 PM

Actually, the plan thus far is that I am going back home to MA for a little bit to make some money there and take care of some stuff, hopefully working either at a rental house, freelancing, (gulp) or possibly a production house. I plan to be out in Cali by the winter.
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#19 Stephen Williams

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 07:43 AM

I plan to be out in Cali by the winter.


Good Luck

Stephen
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#20 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 15 November 2005 - 01:24 AM

Hi,
Annie don't let anyone scare you too much, there is A LOT of work in L.A. (unlike the UK were there is very little work to go round in comparison to the amount of individuals who want to work, as I am sure Phil will testify to), obviously I know nothing about you, your previous work or work ethic etc.. but if you are a hard working, mature, talented and personable individual you should have no problem tapping in to the rich veign of work out here. I have been in LA since graduating film school, from my student reel and contacts I had made while in school I managed to get a good amount of work pretty much as soon as I left Film school, I usually DP but have also gaffed and done a few other positions, but 9 times out of ten I am DPing.
If you need any advice about LA drop me a line, I will be glad to help.
Good Luck.
Cheers.
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