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Using a digital slr for judging exposure


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#1 charles g clark

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Posted 29 October 2005 - 06:47 PM

Just wondering about using a digital slr for judging exposure... assuming a small screen finish what kind of results have you guys got? Any tips on the best slr's for this? Is this a common practice? Does anyone prefer this to a lightmeter? Im about to shoot a 90 second short on 35 using this method and would welcome your thoughts

Charles
(only just been told about my namesake!)
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#2 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 06:24 AM

Rodney Charters, CSC, who shoots 24 apparently does this all the time.

I've tried it on the last couple of film jobs I've done, and been reasonably confident with what the dSLR is telling me. It's not a replacement for a lightmeter, but it is reassuring sometimes to have an image there in front of you.
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#3 Elhanan Matos

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 08:22 PM

I've worked on a couple commercials where this was done too. I've also seen some FX guys do this on a couple green screen shoots.
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#4 Aleksandar Bracinac

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 08:33 PM

Click... ;-)
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#5 Matt Pacini

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 12:59 PM

Are they using this as a REPLACEMENT for a light meter, or just in ADDITION to the light meter?

MP
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#6 Aleksandar Bracinac

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 06:28 PM

I'm using this as replacement. I have no additional light meter.

Here is example

Posted Image
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#7 Jonathan Bryant

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 08:28 PM

I have to say your demo reels look superb! What is your basic film stocks, camera, and lighting package?
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#8 Aleksandar Bracinac

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 08:11 PM

Thank you John, but I think that I have to work more and more to make my showreel superb ;-)


Stocks:

Kodak 5218/7218 and 7205. Next week I'm shooting with Fuji Eterna 500T (8753) and I think I will stay with Fuji for some time. I like what I've seen.


Cameras: 435ES, SR2, and for the first time next week I will try Arri 35-III, Normal 35.

Lights: Arri HMI and tungsten lights, some fluos, skypanels etc. No specific package.
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#9 James Brown

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 09:47 AM

Hi,

I just finished a Kodak 16mm Short course and one of the guys there, a respected Aussie DP always uses his SLR...He is absolutely positive that it has great outcomes. I couldn?t believe this, but his work speaks for itself. Digital Pictures, one of the best post houses in the country tells him they love his work because, exposure wise, its the most consistent out of all the stuff they see. He said that he used a light meter for seven years, then for about 12 months compared his Digital SLR and his Spotty and is now convinced he works better and hasn?t taken out either of his light metres for the last year or so.....

This was a very quick way of working and he also said it is great for him to deal with the post houses, because he goes home, touches up the frame in Photoshop and emails it to the telecine people to show what sort of look he?s after.

It was a Canon, retails about 6 thousand not inc lenses?(sorry not sure of the Specs/info) He also said that he tried the new pro top of the line Digital SLR?S but found the ASA?s aren?t calibrated properly and gave the wrong exposure, so I guess you have to be very careful.

James.
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#10 Miguel Bunster

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 01:09 AM

I am using for reference plus meter my Canon Rebel XT, I am still trying to figure out the right ASA of the camera. Has anyone used this one for reference?
Miguel
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#11 Stephen Williams

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 02:57 AM

Hi,

I own a D70, however the lowest ASA setting is 200.
The other point is its better to overexpose negative slightly and underexpose with digital. I don't intend throwing my lightmeter yet!

Stephen
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#12 James Brown

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 05:41 AM

I don't intend throwing my lightmeter yet!


Don?t get me wrong, as I?m only starting out i intend on using a light meter for several years to come. I was just quite blown away by someone of his stature to be looking like taking the easy way out...Quote "Why would i try and work out what exposure i want by looking at numbers, i look at a picture, and if its too dark or to bright i adjust accordingly"

James.
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#13 Aleksandar Bracinac

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 06:21 AM

Before I start my frist job as DP on film I did lot of testing with my Nikon D70 and the Nikon F75 with the Fuji Superia film. Superia is high-contrast negative film for amateurs and D70 has very "flat" picture.

After the first test, I've asked Mr.Geoff Boyle from CML about metering with DSLR and he reply to me with very positive opinion that I can set my DSLR to ISO 320 for 500ASA film and will be good. 1/3 of a stop to compensate difference between F-stop and T-stop which is usual 1/3 and 1/3 to overexpose film a bit.

All of that I did because of my first DP job wich you can see few post above. I even set up my DSLR to ISO 500 and use exactly the same values for F-stop and T-stop. The most important thing is that you should have a good prime lens on your DSLR with simple construction (less elements inside). If you use some cheep zooms etc. the difference in metering can be more than 1 stop. I've tested Nikkor 35mm f1:2, 50mm 1:1.8 and 50mm 1:1.4. I've found that 50mm 1:1.8 gives best results.

Here is my first test D70 vs Superia 200 (Couldn't find better negative in that moment)
Posted Image
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#14 Stephen Williams

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 07:50 AM

After the first test, I've asked Mr.Geoff Boyle from CML about metering with DSLR and he reply to me with very positive opinion that I can set my DSLR to ISO 320 for 500ASA film and will be good. 1/3 of a stop to compensate difference between F-stop and T-stop which is usual 1/3 and 1/3 to overexpose film a bit.



Hi,

Well film rules!

I think overexposing 1/2-2/3 stop is about right for an average scene. In a very contrasty situation you may need to think a little but its a good starting point.

Stephen
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