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XL2: 24p or Normal Mode


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#1 Roberto Hernandez

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 11:30 PM

I have an upcomming video project which I plan to shoot with an XL2. I would like to take advantage of the 24p feature for a film-like effect. I also know that I am going to be using CineLook for After Effects extensively in post. So my question is, do I shoot in 24p or normal mode if the footage is going to go through CineLook. I am aware that the program adds grain and mimics certain film stocks but does it also replicate film motion? Or am I better off using the 24p feature in camera? Thanks.

Roberto
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 12:17 AM

If you want a 24P look, why shoot in 60i and try and process to get that look when you can shoot 24P in the first place?

Shoot 24P, and then use whatever software adds film grain if you really want that, but don't run 24P material through a film-look program designed to treat 60i material to give it a 24P look, because it doesn't need it. And don't process it at all with any film look software if you plan on transferring it to film.

Don't just apply some post processing without knowing step-by-step what it's doing to the image. If you want 24P motion artifacts and can shoot in 24P, then shoot 24P, not 60i. If you want film grain, then use film grain simulator software, as long as it's not just adding video noise to the image instead.

Also, film look processing is very render-intensive, so if you can just shoot in 24P, you're going to save yourself a lot of rendering time AND it will look better than trying to make 60i look like 24P.
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#3 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 03:40 AM

Hi,
Having used the XL2 a few times I would recomend avoiding the internal "film Grain" setting it just seemed to add video noise to the image, and made the blacks a bit milky. The XL2 can create a very nice image and looks really good in 24p mode, given the right lighting, DOF etc... it can look about as close to 35mm film as you are going to get with Mini-DV. Also beware of grain in post programs because, as David said, they often just make your image noisy. This applies to professional color correction too, I wont say the name of the place but I once took a mini-DV project to a Pro. post CC place and they were really into adding "grain" to the image to make it look more like film, it looked fine on a small monitor but the image was really noisy on a big screen, and we had to go back to the post house and take the "grain" out again. I would suggest just shooting 24p using a shallow DOF, using good lighting (enphasising depth and contrast while avoiding blown out highlights), and use the very useful menus in the XL2, and perhaps a light diffusion filter (1/8 black promist) and you should have an image without too much noise that resembles 35mm as much as it possibly can.
Cheers.
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#4 matthew david burton

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 08:27 AM

Stay away from any kind of grain adding in post all together !
When was the last time you could see any noticable grain on 35mm footage ?
The only thing you will end up with is a realy bad 8mm film look, like from the 1950's.
One of the best thing's after effects can give you is noise or grain removal !

Use 24p as this will record images in a progresive manner, ie the same as film.
Hook your cam up to a monitor and flick between interlaced and progressive and shake the camera about a bit. This will give you a good idea of what the difference is on screen. interlaced having a much more smooth motion, progresive will take the edge of this and give you a little more judder akin to 24p film.
The XL2 has some realy good cine colour tweaks in the menus so play around with all of them !
Post colour adjustments should be a last resort when editing dv source material as their realy isn't that much colour infomation to play with in the first place. Consentrate on getting the lighting and camera adjustments correct at the time of shooting !
Have fun and experiment, most mistakes are best learned the hard way but make sure you learn from them !

-matt

Edited by matthew david burton, 03 November 2005 - 08:37 AM.

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#5 Roberto Hernandez

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 02:55 PM

Thanks Guys!

This has helped a lot.

Thanks David, Tomas, Matthew.


:D
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