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Newbie looking for helpful criticism on wedding video


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#1 Yardsale

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 10:38 PM

I was actually a friend of the girl getting married, and was not a hired videographer. I had no previous camera experience, and I don't know much about non-linear post-production editing either. However, I'd very much like to learn more, and if you could critique my small video, that'd be great. Shouldn't be more than 4-5mb.

http://www.hirethisg...dingtracked.mov

I have thick skin. I know it's bad. With that, have at it :ph34r:
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#2 Erdwolf_TVL

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 11:25 AM

I was actually a friend of the girl getting married, and was not a hired videographer. I had no previous camera experience, and I don't know much about non-linear post-production editing either. However, I'd very much like to learn more, and if you could critique my small video, that'd be great. Shouldn't be more than 4-5mb.

http://www.hirethisg...dingtracked.mov

I have thick skin. I know it's bad. With that, have at it :ph34r:


My advice is to invest in a good tripod :)

Even if you never intend to shoot for money, this is an excellent investment.

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Keep in mind that to shoot a wedding with any degree of professionalism, one needs at least two cameras and two tripods. Two camera operators also helps!

I usually set up one stationary camera either in the back of the church or on the gallery and stand in front near the altar with another.

It takes longer to edit, but a lot of errors can be masked this way.

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When shooting a wedding, you should always be at the venue a few hours before hand. Picture the bride and groom. Ask yourself "What will they do and where?" Pick your shots before the first guests arrive.

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You should allow yourself more freedom of movement than the other guests. Don't be affraid to stand closer to the action by the altar. Otherwise people's heads and shoulders will always get in the way.

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Never, ever underestimate the entertainment value of behind-the-scenes footage!
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#3 Mike Lary

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 11:58 AM

Ditto on the tripod. Also, don't zoom. It looks unprofessional and it attracts attention to the camera. Naturally, you'll need to zoom to get closer framing on a shot, but you should cut the zoom action when you edit. And when you're moving the camera, don't use it as an extension of your head/eyes. Choose your shots wisely. A camera should never be 'looking around' to take everything in. As the camera operator, you should be deciding what visual information the viewer needs to see. Every unmotivated movement of a camera reminds the audience that there IS a camera, and that's the last thing you want - they should be watching the event and the couple.

Edited by MikeL, 05 November 2005 - 12:00 PM.

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#4 Tom Banks

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Posted 05 November 2005 - 12:21 PM

-Get a tripod
-Avoid quick zooms, or at least dont leave them in while editing
-Get a front row seat to film the action, or somewhere where your view isn't blocked
-Get some good closeups
-The black bird with dark clouds was kinda ominous
-The whole rotating camera to get reactions makes me dizzy. Find a good closeup of a member in the crowd, hold the shot for a few seconds, and cut it in.
-End on a nice concluding shot (a wide of the church)
-Nice music!
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#5 Yardsale

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 11:33 PM

Every unmotivated movement of a camera reminds the audience that there IS a camera, and that's the last thing you want - they should be watching the event and the couple.


Great thing to point out! Yeah the zooms should have been left on the cutting room floor. Thanks a lot!

Yeah I should get a tripod for the XL1s. I have worked still photography for a few years, this type of sensibility I should be transferring over to motion. B)

Very good advice, very professional and sound. Thank you so much everyone.
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#6 LondonFilmMan

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 03:58 PM

This is gonna hurt. **sorry**, but you did ask and I do want to be honest. To not be frank wouldn't help you anyway. And if it makes you feel better, when I first started making video, mine also looked that bad!

You *need* a tripod, even a miniature one!!! or prop it on your scrunched up jacket/on a wall/on the grass/anywhere where it will be completely still.

Watch TV. How much camera shake can you see?

Learn how to edit. Mind you, you need good footage to edit in the first place. And when there is no audio and you put music there, its all too easy for it to 'feel' nice. But, think about it... ...what use is it without dialogue?

Invest in a proper mic. Position it and capture good audio.

Your shots are unplanned (you imply this yourself anyway).

Now, importantly...the quality....what you see on the tiny screen on your view finder does not mean that if you show it on a huge TV that the quality will look the same, but larger. At least get a 3CCD camera. Keep going because you have one thing that really counts. The want to make good video. You can learn quickly! Good luck in the future...
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#7 Yardsale

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Posted 13 November 2005 - 06:03 PM

Now, importantly...the quality....what you see on the tiny screen on your view finder does not mean that if you show it on a huge TV that the quality will look the same, but larger. At least get a 3CCD camera. Keep going because you have one thing that really counts. The want to make good video. You can learn quickly! Good luck in the future...


I think most people beat you to the punch as far as suggestions but thanks also :D

I did shoot with a 3CCD camera. My XL1s does not have a viewfinder, it's all through the eyepiece :unsure:
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