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Old 7245 50D?


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#1 Richard Vialet

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 05:37 PM

Hey everyone!

I'm shooting some exterior shots for this student project this week on old 7245 stock. It's about 5-6 years old. Now, I have no time to clip test but I'm thinking that because the 45 has such low grain in the first place the grain might not be that bad (i'm not sure about fogging though) I've been wondering about how I can compensate...I was thinking of overexposing by 2/3 of a stop and rate the film at EI 32. I would rate it more and pull process but the school is paying for processing and they won't pay for special processing. I wanted to know what else I can do to compensate for any aging problems. Also, I want to know how this 2/3 overexposure would affect the image with normal processing. I'm getting a best light telecine transfer; no film print...

Please let me know your opinions
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#2 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 08:03 PM

I'd go further than that - I'd go for at least a stops over-exposure, maybe even one and a half.

No need to pull process - if you're going for a print at the end you can just print down. And if you're going for telecine it's even easier - just grade it down in best (just shoot a grey card or tell the TK operator to keep it down).
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#3 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 04:42 AM

Hey everyone!

I'm shooting some exterior shots for this student project this week on old 7245 stock. It's about 5-6 years old. Now, I have no time to clip test but I'm thinking that because the 45 has such low grain in the first place the grain might not be that bad (i'm not sure about fogging though) I've been wondering about how I can compensate...I was thinking of overexposing by 2/3 of a stop and rate the film at EI 32. I would rate it more and pull process but the school is paying for processing and they won't pay for special processing. I wanted to know what else I can do to compensate for any aging problems. Also, I want to know how this 2/3 overexposure would affect the image with normal processing. I'm getting a best light telecine transfer; no film print...

Please let me know your opinions


Hi,

If the film has been in a fridge then about 1 stop overexposure should be fine. As your going to telecine you should be able to compensate for any fogging .
I once called up Fuji Switzerland and complained they were charging full price for F64D that I knew was over 2 years old! They said Low ASA stocks are factory fresh for 4 years!

Stephen
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#4 Richard Vialet

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 03:19 PM

Hi,

If the film has been in a fridge then about 1 stop overexposure should be fine. As your going to telecine you should be able to compensate for any fogging .
I once called up Fuji Switzerland and complained they were charging full price for F64D that I knew was over 2 years old! They said Low ASA stocks are factory fresh for 4 years!

Stephen




So would the 1-stop overexposure not be a problem after I process normal...or would it be TOO overexposed and I would HAVE to correct it in telecine?
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#5 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 08:54 PM

So would the 1-stop overexposure not be a problem after I process normal...or would it be TOO overexposed and I would HAVE to correct it in telecine?


Your latitude is all on the overexposure side with colour negative films in general. That is why they used to sell 126 catriges of film rated at 200, and had good results when folks used them in instamatic cameras made when the film was rated at 80.

AS another datapoint, I did a test recently with a still roll of 5247 that I got back in 1986, ie in my freezer for 20 years. Fog was high, but the image looked full bodied on the film. Oviously such an extreme case is not recomended. This was with normal exposure.

As always with anything out of the ordinary, if you can posibly make a test, even if it is to do repeatable work early and try to get the first roll back before you do your "hard to do" shots.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 01:01 AM

7245 that has been in cold storage for 5 to 6 years may show a slight increase in fog level, which could be measured by a simple "clip test" run by your lab. Always a good idea to give a slightly "rich" exposure with older color negative film, to place the scene information up the curve, away from any fog in the shadows. With higher speed films (e.g., 500T), ambient radiation can be a significant factor with old film, even when refrigerated.
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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 04:29 AM

So would the 1-stop overexposure not be a problem after I process normal...or would it be TOO overexposed and I would HAVE to correct it in telecine?


Hi,

I think 1 stop maximum, don't round up or anything! I would personally aim for 1/2-2/3 stop over.
A test is always a good idea with old film!

Stephen
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#8 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 06:47 AM

Hey everyone!

I'm shooting some exterior shots for this student project this week on old 7245 stock. It's about 5-6 years old. Now, I have no time to clip test but I'm thinking that because the 45 has such low grain in the first place the grain might not be that bad (i'm not sure about fogging though) I've been wondering about how I can compensate...I was thinking of overexposing by 2/3 of a stop and rate the film at EI 32. I would rate it more and pull process but the school is paying for processing and they won't pay for special processing. I wanted to know what else I can do to compensate for any aging problems. Also, I want to know how this 2/3 overexposure would affect the image with normal processing. I'm getting a best light telecine transfer; no film print...

Please let me know your opinions


Old stocks, tend to loose some colour characteristics too, usually the Green curve of the stock gets weaker, wich as a final result u get some magenta tint.A test is the best solution, I would suggest 30meters strip shooting colour patches and a person, with different f/stops.
You will then see the tendency of the film to colour some dark areas, especially when underexposed,(all negatives do this) but the old ones maybe will do it more.
Kodak is a very reliable company,I have done tests with old stocks,(1-2 yrs after expiration and the result was great), I believe that good storage is the point.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#9 Dominic Case

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 07:07 PM

SLow stocks such as 7245 have a relatively long shelf life. If it has been refrigerated, you won't have any problems. If not, it's unpredicatable.

Still, as has been suggested, overexposing by up to a stop will be perfectly safe. Don't even think about pull processing or anything, it wouldn't help.

One stop over won't present any problems on telecine: if the fog level is good, you will have a good rich negative with loads of shadow detail, and a best light transfer will be easy and good.

If the fog level is up, then the overexposure won't present any problems that you wouldn't have anyway as a result of the fog level: and lifting your image over the fog will once again make it a good and easy best-light transfer.
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#10 Richard Vialet

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 12:13 AM

Thank you everyone for their thoughts and suggestions, it's made me more confident with shooting this old stock!!!

That's why I love this site!!!
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Metropolis Post

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Tai Audio

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

Glidecam