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I can't get enough of this lighting thing...


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#1 Cody Jordan

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 06:23 AM

hey guys, just bought an Arri lighting kit (tungsten softbank 1)... I love it. However, as a newcomer to the whole lighting thing, im starting to get frustrated because I don't know how these beautiful toys!?!! From my understanding, just experimenting with lights is the best way to go. I like to refer to it as painting with lights.

However, I really want to get as much knowledge and experience as possible... I feel both my fundamentals and creative eye could use some work. What are some really good resources that can help speed up my learning process. Is there any specific books or dvds out there that are worth the time and money? I wish I was able to do some grip work on a few big budget films just to get some real world experience. Come to think of it, how hard is it to find some PA work in LA? I have no clue where to start! (I'm in florida, and yes I'd be willing to move out there at some point).

Also,is there any equipment that would be necessary to expand on my kit? Flouro's, c-stands, bounceboards.. etc. I'd love to have something basic and versatile!


Here is a grab from my very first lighting setup:
(I'm using a dvx100 - I also added blurr effect in post and I don't really like it)

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#2 Jonathan Spear

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 12:57 PM

"Matters of Light and Depth" by Ross Lowel is awesome, easy to read and very informative.
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#3 Jonathan Spear

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 01:25 PM

Re: the shot..

The lighting is simple, warm and nice, but I can't seem to overlook your subject's loose white t-shirt.
If he was wearing darker colors it would look more "professional" in my opinion.
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#4 Dickson Sorensen

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 02:30 PM

Come to think of it, how hard is it to find some PA work in LA? I have no clue where to start! (I'm in florida, and yes I'd be willing to move out there at some point).


You don't need to move to LA to learn lighting and become a really great DP some day. There are lots of great gaffers, cameramen and a thriving film business in Florida. I was once sitting in a production office at Universal in Orlando talking with a PA who was telling me about her plans to go to LA to get into the business. In walked an Assistant Cameraman from LA who had moved to Florida to try to find work there. The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

Edited by Dickson Sorensen, 08 November 2005 - 02:31 PM.

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#5 Michael Collier

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 03:37 PM

I like the lighting in that shot.


Now as an avid photoshop user I can tell you photoshop has no place in DP. color correction asside it should be all in camera to get the blur you are looking for. Look at his shirt, it has varying patterns of softness and solation. If the image were moving I assume it would look like the lord of the rings effect when he puts the ring on.

Whats more, having the camera naturally blur the background is so much more pleasing, because its real and our eyes register it as real.
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#6 Alex Haspel

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 12:31 PM

Posted Image


hi.

what disturbs me about that blur is that it is in the foreground as well as in the background.
this looks a bit too unatural for my taste.
instead try shooting fully wide open (if the quality of your lenses allows it) and you'll have some real
unsharpness if your not not going totally wide angled.

and as for the lightning:
my first thought was that the key light and the rim (if it is called like that in english) are both on the left side.
i would have placed the key on right side, leaving the persons left side of the face (from cameras angle) darker,
and have a warmer rim (probably with a half cto, considering youre shooting with tungsten lights and tungsten preset) on the left side, motivated by that practical back there.

but that's just my opinion.

good luck and all that,
i hope you find my critique useful.

-alex

Edited by haspel, 09 November 2005 - 12:38 PM.

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#7 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 02:50 PM

I think the lighting is ok. If you really want to be a dp you dont have to La. I am get alot of experience in Virginia. I have been dp, gaffer, & key grip on tons of shoots. Also you have to start training your eye when it comes to lighting. Where ever I go I always study the light. Bathrooms, hospitals, hotels, restaurants, parks, etc... I try to figure out the direction and the behavior of light in all these areas. After that I usually do film test to see how well I can duplicate it. I believe that once you understand the behavior of light in different environments the better equipped you are in any situation.
Mario C. Jackson
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