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Film Stocks: Choices to make


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#1 SSJR

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Posted 10 November 2005 - 03:10 AM

Anyone, can you please help..

First Question

So I have a shoot coming up with some Interior night shots. I will be using a 1.2k hmi for my key/ moon light through a window with a tree branch as a cookie and white transparent curtains for dif. for fill im using cheated candle light and practicals . What is the best stock to intermix the two color temperatures? I'm thinking 5218 or 5279. If i do intermix two colors what's the best way to accurately meter for the two?

Second.

If im shooting a tungsten stock out doors and I put on the 85 filter. do i compensate for both light lost through the filter plus rate it at daylight iso rating or does the daylight iso rating already compensate for the light lost by the 85 filter?

Last

If I want a old home film film look for a day interior shot, what is the best 16mm film stock to use? I was thinking Kodachrome but there probably won't be not enough light even if i use the 1.2k HMI as a fake window.... My options are limited. Kodak keeps discontinuing stocks :P Maybe i can push or pull a stock. Have some kind of treatment. Any good ideas how to achieve this?
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#2 Will Montgomery

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 03:14 PM

If I want a old home film film look for a day interior shot, what is the best 16mm film stock to use? I was thinking Kodachrome but there probably won't be not enough light even if i use the 1.2k HMI as a fake window....

16mm Kodachrome looks surprisingly good and not as "home movie" as I would have thought. How about Ektachrome?
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#3 Joseph White

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 09:01 PM

i have generally found that 5218 handles mixed color temperatures very nicely, as do many of the vision2 films. 5279 is generally more saturated, has slightly more grain, and more contrast - it's a gorgeous stock in my opinion, but it sounds like 5218 might work well for what you're trying to do.

when using a tungsten film outdoors with an 85 filter, i'd generally go with the reccomended ISO indicated on the can (generally 2/3 of a stop). if you're shooting 5218 outdoors, you'd rate it at 320 if you were rating the film normally. the daylight rating on the can assumes the use of an 85 filter, so thats the correct number.

in terms of the home movie look, are you finishing on film or video? if you're finishing to tape, i'd shoot a faster 16mm stock - or even super8mm like the new ektachrome 64t - and play around in telecine. if going to print, the optical blowup alone will add grain if you're doing a photochemical finish as opposed to a DI. I'd say go super 8mm, but if you want to go 16mm try and find some old short ends of 7279 or fuji f-500 (both have been discontinued in 16mm sadly, but you might be able to find recans or shortends somewhere like Dr. Rawstock or Media Distributors). generally the faster 16mm stocks will give you a lot of grain and contrast - you can also experiment with flashing or push processing to give it a different look as well.
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 11 November 2005 - 10:48 PM

in terms of the home movie look, .....I'd say go super 8mm,.... - you can also experiment with flashing or push processing to give it a different look as well.


One thing about super 8 is that most home movies were shot at 18FPS. and regular 8 was at 16FPS. This causes a little unstedyness in the motion. You might be able to do some tricks with your printing or transfer to enulate that effect. SAy shooting at 16FPS, and copying every second frame twice .. 1,2,2,3,4,4,5,6,6,...to get the unsteadyness into the motion. heck you could probaly try shooting at 12 FPS and repeating every frame.
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Willys Widgets

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