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Tyler Purcell

Member Since 27 Dec 2007
Offline Last Active Today, 05:47 PM
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In Topic: Some guy sold his Ursa Mini Pro to buy an FS7

Today, 02:51 PM

The best of the best in terms of digital, right now, is still Arri.


Arri doesn't even make a 4k cinema camera. So I wouldn't consider them "the best" anymore. Yes their imager is great, but that's about the only thing worth noting these days. I personally prefer working with the Red's because they're smaller and when you shoot at 6k and down scale to 4k, you get a full 16 bit 444 image out of it, which is stellar. You have to upscale the Alexa footage to get 4k out of it, which is to say the least, not a great way to go. Plus, to get 16 bit out of an Alexa, you need to shoot Arriraw which is HUGE and painful in post, where Red Code gives you 16 bit native and is pretty lightweight in comparison. 
 

Blackmagic, even the URSA Mini Pro, is still a low-cost camera, which means many corners are being cut.


Wait a second... you don't think there are corners being cut on Canon, Sony, Panasonic cameras of similar price? The Japanese cut even MORE corners then the Blackmagic does, FAR MORE.

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that shoots 12 bit RAW internally. The C200 is 10 bit BTW. I'll throw 12 and 10 bit iFrame codec into this question, because not even the FS7 does higher then 10 bit 4:2:2 without spending a lot more money on RAW capture. Basically nothing even remotely close to the URSA price tag captures anything decent internally. 

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that has interchangeable lens mounts, not adaptors, but entire mount replacements for Canon, Nikon, PL and B4, but still retains a filter wheel. 

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that has 12 channel AES audio input, so you can run your mixers audio directly into the camera to capture full bandwidth audio. I'll also point out, the URSA Mini Pro will capture off it's internal stereo mic's for scratch AND it's multichannel input at the same time. To me, this is a huge feature no other manufacturer has even bothered putting into their cameras. 

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that has 12g SDI (4k 60fps) I/O ports. This is one of the most critical features for live shooting, so you can give "return" video to the camera at the same resolution the camera is shooting at.

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that uses standard V-mount (or any mount for that matter) batteries, no stupid odd-ball "brand specific" battery system that costs money, but also is more likely to fail. Also, because it uses standard batteries, you can buy a v mount D-tap adaptor that will give you as many power taps as you could ever want/need without using the camera itself to power anything.

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that can take 12 - 30v with standard 4 pin XLR power? This is so critical because you never know where you're going to be and having the ability to use pretty much anything, with industry standard power connections, is so nice.

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that has a built in rail system for Matteboxes and follow focuses (it's part of the standard accessory kit). Heck, name one that has a built-in mounting holes on top. Nearly all of the Japanese cameras have one or two mounts on top, which is not enough. Plus the URSA Mini Pro's mount is very heavy duty, not just part of the plastic housing. I'll also mention the shoulder mounting abilities which the Japanese don't do without 3rd party upgrades.

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that uses STANDARD SD cards (2) OR STANDARD CFast cards (2). This is a huge one as most manufacturers pigeonhole you into buying THEIR storage medium and restrict you to one or the other. Blackmagic has zero restrictions, you chose the medium you wish to use and use it. This is a HUGE advantage in my opinion because it keeps cost down when you don't need to record high bandwidth video.

Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that has a decent viewfinder! The URSA Mini Pro has a 2k OLED viewfinder (it's part of the standard accessory kit) On the Japanese cameras they either use a display as a viewfinder, which sucks OR they have this little tiny hole in the back which is completely worthless. I'll also point out, the URSA Mini Pro uses standard BNC SDI ports for it's viewfinder unlike the competition, who force you to buy their specialized viewfinders due to having proprietary ports.
 
Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that uses convection cooling, without the necessity of having fans. This is a HUGE problem with the Japanese cinema cameras, they pack them so tight inside, the fans are critical for cooling. The EVA1, Canon C series, FS5/FS7, all of these cameras, the fans can get pretty annoying after long recordings, especially in hot situations. The URSA Mini Pro uses convection cooling, so it naturally draws air from the bottom of the body, through the heat sync which is the entire main housing and out the top. Yes it does have a fan on the bottom, but it barely moves and because they use active refrigerant inside the cooling tubes, no matter what the camera will make zero noise, even in the most extreme conditions. 
 
Please, name a sub $10k Japanese camera that utilizes a bluetooth camera assistant tool. The URSA mini pro can be run entirely from any iOS device, with full menu controls AND the ability to jam sync as well. This function is super awesome to have when on set because you can literally adjust the camera settings in the video village remotely. The software also works as a digital slate, with the ability to label clips as you're recording. So when you get into post production, everything has the proper scene/shot names on them already. (The EVA1 does some of this, but not standard, the consumer must buy a special wifi device that sticks in the back. It also doesn't act as a slate or clip labeling function, just menus) 
 
I could go on all day about the "technology" the Japanese skimped out on, but these are some pretty kickass features Blackmagic felt were more important to have than 15,000 ISO (which I think is stupid) and 1000FPS (which I also think is stupid). When I look at the URSA Mini Pro, I look at a cinema camera, not a swiss army knife. I don't want it to do anything else but create great images at 23.98/24fps with the occasional over-crank to 48fps maybe. When you build a camera that does everything, you restrict its ability to do ONE THING really great and that's my biggest beef with the sub 10k competition. Also remember, the URSA Mini Pro completely decked out brand new with all the accessories is $8500 USD. In fact, I've seen them sell as complete kits on ebay for $7999 out the door including shipping. That makes it VERY competitive on price vs function in the sub $10k category. 
 
I'll just say for the record the video Brian posted is EXACTLY how I feel about the other cameras. Whenever I work with blackmagic, they always just flat out work for me in post, beautiful images every time and I always struggle with the other brands. For me, that means I can spend less time in post tweaking and more time editing, which means in the long run my product looks more cinematic without needing a higher end camera. 

To me, they're not cutting corners... they're just focused on not fighting against the Japanese in terms of "features". They're focused on image quality at base ISO at standard (23.98/24/25/30) frame rates. Which the Japanese manufacturers have totally forgotten.
 

The image is good from the URSA, but the build quality of Blackmagic in general leaves a lot to be desired, and they are still not as reliable as Arri.


Well, you can't compare a $65,000 camera with a $5,999 camera now can you? Personally, I haven't seen any build quality issues with the Blackmagic cameras (or products) I own. I know the first batch of URSA Mini's had some issues, but the Pro's have been pretty good thus far. They've been more on top of software updates then any other camera system that I've seen from them, which is nice.

Personally, I don't think there is much of a choice in the sub $10k market. I think the Japanese spend to much time fighting against each other feature wise, they have lost track of what's important. The only Japanese camera I like the look of are the Canon's, but everything else about them is horrible. So that's why the URSA Mini Pro appears to be the only real option. It's got the critical features in a package that's reasonably priced, with a more then perfect post workflow. So outside of those people who need greater than 1600 ISO, or better than 60fps 4k slow-mo, the Ursa Mini Pro should fit the bill for everyone else. 


In Topic: Some guy sold his Ursa Mini Pro to buy an FS7

Yesterday, 09:21 PM

It would depend on the type of work you do. If you were doing, single person crew, low light filming or productions that tend not to do much colour grading in post it may be less suitable.


The blackmagic cameras are the easiest to grade in post, so they're ideal for simple post workflow. I have yet to work with a better post friendly system then Blackmagic, nothing else even comes close. Pro Res is the industry standard for iFrame codec's and there are 4 flavors build-in to the camera + 2 flavors of raw (compressed and uncompressed).

If you need more than 1600 ISO you need more light. I've shot 800 ISO exterior at night and it's been fine. I still to this day don't understand why anyone would need more than 1600 ISO for anything.

This video doesn't mention the beautiful shoulder kit Blackmagic developed for the URSA Mini, which allows for shoulder work very easily. The other cameras have nothing like that, nor do they have built-in rails like the URSA mini as well. So there are A LOT of benefits to that stuff which he never talked about in the video. It almost seemed as if the monitor not turning completely around was the biggest failure for the reviewer.

In Topic: Some guy sold his Ursa Mini Pro to buy an FS7

Yesterday, 02:06 PM

Interesting caparison of cameras, although a FS5 rather than FS7.
 
https://www.provideo...camera-shootout


Thanks for sharing! Yea as I suspected, the URSA Mini Pro does look the best in my opinion and is clearly the easiest to grade. It also has the best controls/menu. Bigger/heavier, but eh... it uses real batteries, not toy proprietary batteries.

It's unfortunate he never talked about the recording medium! EEEK!

In Topic: WTB Vision 2 5205 or similar 35mm stock - recans, shortends, etc.

Yesterday, 02:51 AM

I got 5218 which is vision 2 500t that's pretty out of date but may work?

In Topic: Imac Prooooooooo......

Yesterday, 01:55 AM

Like I said a few posts up, that attitude reflected in their product.


Yep, well that was a time of turmoil for the company. They really didn't get things back together until 2003 ish and by then it was too late. Apple nearly went out of business because they kept on trying to make what the PC manufacturers were making and it was never going to work. The Power PC processing RISC infrastructure was leaps and bounds better than any of the other consumer processors at the time. Apple also had a much bigger market share in 1992, they had "professional" computers with NUBUS ports! Imagine that! The problem is that Apple was very proprietary, thus manufacturers need to make special versions of software and hardware just for them and Apple was charging exorbitant amounts of money for their hardware. When Jobs was kicked out of the company, Apple's board of directors slowly killed it by giving away the OS for cheap money to "clone" manufacturers. When Jobs came back in 1998, the company was in shambles and it took him 6 years to re-align it and by 2007 it was going strong. Hardware was the same between macs and pc's, plus Apple had gobs of professional products from a bitchin' server OS to post production software and storage. They were rising to the top, but Jobs killed it all off in favor of a much larger market; the mobile one. He switched gears at a moment where Apple was finally a threat to windows again, but sabotaged what could have been. Now Apple makes "devices" and they're starting to fail at that as well. What's next? Will Apple be a media company? Some people think they'll buy Netflix and start to make more media devices. 
 
So yes... had Apple just stayed it's grounds and continued to support the professional infrastructure, they'd be in much different place today. 
 

And in terms of media hardware, I remember showing one their interns whose father was the marketing VP for SEGA America at the time, a vid regarding a dedicated card that could handle BETACAM editing that you dropped into a high end PC.  His attitude was that Apple was coming out with something next year.  This was circa 1992...maybe 93 or 94.  Well, Apple never did come out with anything close.  They were still selling the little smiley face Mac and I think .... thinking here ... coming out with the PC-Mac that could run both OSes and consequently both sets of software.


In 1993 they came out with the "AV" powermac's, first with composite video only, but eventually in 1995 the Power Mac 7500 had 525i video AND AUDIO I/O built-in. Yes it was crude and couldn't be used for commercial capturing as the processing board wasn't high enough quality, but it did exist and it was a huge step in the right direction. Soon there after I did have a real capture card and a very easily editing software package, of whoms name I don't recall. It did work pretty well, but it was not an Apple product. Even though MY powermac 8500 was far more advanced, it's A/V capabilities were limited and Apple switched to PCI bus soon there after which means, no more old NUBUS card.

Honestly, I didn't start editing non-linearly until firewire came out in around 1996 ish and even then, apple was late to adopt. I believe my first editing bay was my Power Mac 8600 with a firewire board. I had a DSR-20 deck from the studio, perminantly setup at home and I would take my tapes, injest them into a program called DV EDIT and edit my shows. Eventually I was part of the development team on FCP and started using that. So firewire was really the first way of getting decent quality video into mac's without spending a fortune and it really did open the doors for me to more NLE editing. I stuck with DV editing on FCP until 2009 when I sold my cameras and got my first intel based mac tower, having stuck with G5's for a lot longer then I should have.

Funny enough, it wasn't until 2013 that I finally had a 10 bit 444 1080p edit bay at home and 2017 when I switched to 12 bit 444 4k. It's amazing to think that I started editing at home 20 years ago this year. I gotta dig up my first edit, it's gotta be on a drive somewhere. The fact I still have Final Cut Pro on my machine in a working version, is pretty mind blowing as well. I can't believe we've been on this editing ride together for such a long time, half my life!

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CineLab

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera