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Tyler Purcell

Member Since 27 Dec 2007
Offline Last Active Today, 03:50 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Entry Level Positions on Documentaries

Today, 03:49 PM

Depends on what you wanna do. If you wanna edit a documentary, you'd probably be more of an assistant as most doc filmmakers have editing chops and know what they want. It's only when you get into the real high end stuff, where the budgets can afford real post production support, that things change. 

 

I'm a documentary filmmaker, I've been specializing in the field for nearly my entire life, mostly because I like telling stories and it takes years to tell stories in narrative forum. I've found the documentary process very entertaining and pretty fun, especially when I'm given a challenge of telling a story in limited amount of shooting and post time. 

 

I'm always prepping, shooting and editing a documentary. Right this second I'm finishing a cut of one for a friend, I'm shooting two (both on film) and I'm prepping another that will be shot next year. I find the process to be a 360 degree turn from conventional narrative, commercial/industrial work. Like most doc filmmakers, I'm a one man band with zero crew. Yes I do have a producer, but she doesn't do much besides setup interviews and help schedule things. This is pretty typical for documentary filmmakers, they run the camera, they even setup the lighting/mic's and such. You've gotta be super technical and understand your limitations on set, like what you can and can't bring with you etc. I have two very nice travel kits, one digital and one film, both fit into super small backpacks. Nobody would know I was off shooting a documentary film. You can see some of the highlights in my cinematography.com blog: http://www.cinematog...showtopic=76110

 

Anyway, I'd just go out and make my own doc really. I think trying to cling onto someone else isn't the right idea unless you just wanna shoot and/or edit, in which case, it's only about your demo reel at that point. 

 

[shamless_plug] Here is a link for a teaser of my upcoming doc about shooting on film. Sadly, I had a major setback recently where two of my interviewee's backed out due to financial constraints and they aren't shooting their movies at all now. So I need to find a few more people to interview on this subject and shoot BTS.  . [/shameless_plug]


In Topic: Film Database Software/Organiation

Today, 03:38 PM

I used to use Filemaker and I was pretty good at programming it, so we had pretty complex tasks it could do including sending out automated e-mails using a subscription based web platform. 


In Topic: Film base scratch question

Today, 03:35 PM

The final rinse contains a formaldelyde preservative which isn't supposed to be washed off, so it should smell a bit of that. What it shouldn't smell of is fixer.

 

Sure, it's just... it smells more then normal. For instance, if I send a roll to Fotokem and they throw it on a 35mm line, it smells fine. On the 16mm line, it smells like chemicals. I don't remember what fixer smells like anymore, it's been years since I've been in a dark room. :(


In Topic: Film base scratch question

Today, 12:19 PM

You should have a discussion with Fotokem.  I have had a long running problem with a 'stickiness' issue with them.  In a looping system the film just will not slip against itself until I treat it with a solvent.  Fotokem have never given me any satisfactory answer and "we have never had this problem before" just isn't helpful.  It seems that your 'cinch' marks are another lab issue.  But don't expect any resolution...

Yeeep... I do think it's a lab issue and no they won't do anything about it. Also, every roll I get back from them seems to be poorly washed, it wrinkles and smells like chemicals. 

 

Roger Deakins said it best... the old film workflow is gone. Nobody on the west coast does lab work like it use to be done. 

 

Also... 

 

I tore my camera apart last night and looked at every surface, most importantly the loop guides top and bottom of the magazine, as the scratches are patterned along with each frame. I couldn't find anything wrong and I have a habit of making tight loops, so the film should never touch the loop guides anyway. 


In Topic: Am I "Wrong" For Liking Fast Shutter?

18 July 2018 - 10:59 AM

With digital, I've gone as little as 45 degree's. It actually seemed to help with rolling shutter effect on the pocket cameras. 


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Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Tai Audio