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Tyler Purcell

Member Since 27 Dec 2007
Online Last Active Today, 08:56 PM
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Topics I've Started

Selling/Trading 35mm Vision 3 short ends 200T/500T/250D

19 March 2018 - 03:10 AM

Hey guys, 

 

I recently spend several thousand dollars to secure over 30,000ft of 35mm Vision 3 short ends from a film that just wrapped production. My hopes are to sell some of it and trade some for 16mm stock to help my current production. All film is re-cans, but the lengths are decent, with some full 1000ft loads. I'll be trying to sell the longer loads first if I can. 

 

Right now I have: 

 

15,000ft of 5213 Vision 3 200T (Price = .32/ft)

10,000ft of 5219 Vision 3 500T (Price = .32/ft)

5,000ft of 5207 Vision 3 250D (Price = .28/ft) 

1,800ft of 5218 Vision 2 500T (Price = .10ft) used as a special look for a certain scene

 

I'm very interested in trading some of this for NEW 16mm stock of the same value, as I'm currently producing a doc on S16 and paying for new stock from kodak has been a killer financially. 

 

Otherwise, please PM me and let me know how much stock you're looking for and I will see if I can fulfill the requirement. 


Kodak 16mm Vision and Vision 2 film stock for sale

05 January 2018 - 02:31 AM

I'm gonna be selling off a lot of older stock that I'm never going to use. 
 
Here is what I currently have in inventory. I don't know the history of any of this stuff, so it's not something I'd use for anything but a camera test and/or getting a particular look. I will try to include the dates below if I know them. 
 
I'm not really interested in making much money off this stuff, just want it to go to a good home. So make me an offer via PM and I'll get back to you ASAP. 
 
2X Vision 1 7274 200T 2R (double perf) 1*400ft (new/sealed) and 1*300ft short end (98')
2X Vision 1 7264 250D 2R (double perf) 400ft/ea (new/sealed) (98')
2X Vision 1 7289 800T 1R (single perf) 400ft/ea (new/sealed) (98')
 
4X Vision 2 7217 200T 1R (single perf) 160ft/ea (short end) (2011)
4X Vision 2 7217 200T 1R (single perf) 75 - 80ft/ea (short end) (2011)
 
1x Vision 2 7217 200T 1R (single perf) 209ft (short end) (2011) 
1x Vision 2 7217 200T 1R (single perf) 178ft (short end) (2011)
 
I do have some piecemeal 35mm I'm trying to part with too... but it's just old stuff, mostly vision 1 and 2, short ends, but not too short. 

 

Let me know if ya'll looking for stuff! 


My new cosplay documentary being shot on film

26 December 2017 - 04:47 PM

In fall of 2016, I wrote a script that featured a teenager with a badly damaged face from a fire. After doing research, I stumbled upon the furry fandom as a potential activity where he could wear a costume and be in public without being ashamed of who he is. This led to months of research, writing a pretty good script and then going back to research the fandom even more. Come April, I was hooked on the fandom, mostly the people and the stories they weave. The community is full of mental health issues, broken families, difficult upbringings, sexuality issues, etc and being a storyteller, I saw a huge opportunity to take their stories and put them on film.
 
sniper_tyler.jpg
 
At first it was going to be a narrative series, but after discussing it with producers, building budgets, casting and scripting the first few shows, I was seeing too many timing conflicts with a low-pay crew, locations and cast. It was getting ugly real fast and instead of continuing down that road, I decided to put the narrative series on hold and switch gears to a documentary series that I can shoot on my own. I brought in a great friend of mine to produce with me and Ive already started the shooting process.
 
The interviews will all be shot digitally, using my pocket cameras, with Rokinon DS primes. This is mainly due to their ease of transport, but also I have 2 complete rigs, so that means I can run two cameras for all the interviews. The rest of the show will all be on film and I plan on shooting Super 8, Super 16 and S35, using my cameras: Beaulieu 4008 Super 8, Aaton XTR Prod Super 16 and Aaton 35III 3 perf. The show is going to be produced entirely in 1080p @ 1.75:1 aspect ratio. This is mainly because the distribution channel is web, so there is no reason to go higher then 1080p. The super 8 will be scanned at 2k, the s16 at 2.5k and the 35mm at 4k, then all prepped for a 1080p edit in Avid.
 
aaton_horse.jpg
 
So why film? Well, its undeniably a different look than anything else out there, especially in the core group of people who are going to be watching it. The other reason is simply visibility, people who may not watch such content, will watch because frankly it looks interesting and different then anything out there.
 
Deanna_tye_35mm.jpeg
 
I put together two demos (shot on 35mm, finished in 4k) which will have some overlay historical pictures on them when finished, as a way to attract people to the project. This gives an idea of what the show will look like, even when the pacing is slowed down to compensate for the added imagery when it arrives.
 
First some stills: 
 
deanna_cerros_horse_BW.jpg
 
deanna_smile.jpg




Phantom Thread: A masterpiece of photochemical glory

25 December 2017 - 07:48 PM

Its very rare in this day of poor movies only designed to make money, to see something as elegant and well made as Paul Thomas Andersons new movie The Phantom Thread. This seemingly simple love story between a self-absorbed dressmaker (Reynolds Woodcock) and yet another model (Alma), has much complexity lying below the surface. As director Paul Thomas Anderson explained in a recent interview; the script is thin, because the story is told through looks. This sort of storytelling works well in a period piece, which this very much is. Anderson came up with the story researching fashion industry mogul Cristóbal Balenciaga. Set in the 1950s England, Woodcock played by Daniel Day-Lewis, is a self-absorbed career-minded dressmaker, who is seemingly only interested in women for their shape. Hes obsessed with finding the perfect shape to help guide his dressmaking and after he kicks out his previous in-house girl, finds Alma (played by Vicky Krieps) a cafe worker near his sea-side home. He falls madly in love with her body and Alma has nowhere to go, so shes dragged into his world.

At first, she loves being pampered and dressed, but eventually realizes Woodcock is a very difficult and distant person to be around. His obsession with work is nearly constant, which puts their relationship into uneven territory. This is not helped by Woodcocks sister Cyril (played by Lesley Manville) who lives with him as well. Shes seen these relationships come and go, seemingly dozens of them in recent years. Shes there to protect and manage her brother and rightly so, he needs managing. Alma does truly love Woodcock and tries desperately to save the relationship because she knows deep inside, he loves her too. After many failed attempts, she goes for the jugular and like a Shakespearian play. Her very rash and dangerous thought process, puts them back together again in an unexpected way. Woodcock eventually catches on to her madness, but instead of punishing her, accepts its the only thing that will keep them together.

This wonderful, beautiful and lush story is acted with impeccable precision and love by three brilliant actors, some whove already won awards for their performances this year, even though the movie isnt being released until January. The story goes that Paul Thomas Anderson wrote the story years ago for Daniel Day-Lewis, who is long retired from acting. It was about convincing him to come out of retirement, that was the delay in production. It was Lewis who found the movies leading lady Vicky Krieps, who until this point had not played a leading lady in an American film. The two of them have amazing chemistry, to the point where they seem like old mates from another life. This is one of Daniel Day-Lewiss best performances of his entire career. Its incredible seeing him on screen, he is a tour de force and constantly amazes the viewers at every moment. Even in static shots of his face, you can see him thinking, he really is Reynolds Woodcock. Then there is his sister Cyril, what a magnificent performance by Lesley Manville, a British television regular. She is the glue that binds the story and Woodcocks life together.

Since this movie is a period piece, costumes, vehicles, buildings, everything needed to be adjusted to fit the period and there were little to no touch ups done in post. The costume design was outstanding, not just the dresses made by Woodcock, but also the normal clothes people wore. You could feel the fabric as it was being worked with, you could smell the rooms and hear the creeks as people walked around. The entire movie was shot on location, both in London and a near-by seaside town. This allowed the production to focus on just a few places, which makes the art direction that much better.

This movie is the first time Paul Thomas Anderson worked without a cinematographer. His normal DP Robert Elswit, was unavailable but his normal crew was available. Since all you really need is a vision, great gaffer and camera crew, the role of a DP isnt AS important. Michael Bauman was credited as the lighting cameraman which is incidentally the same credit as Kibrick used on his movies. Its not easy to shoot a period piece, mostly taking place in a small practical (on location) rooms, but the cinematography on this movie was impeccable. Shot in 3 perf 35mm with Kodak Vision 200T and 500T stocks, the movie looks absolutely stunning and fits the period perfectly. Anderson works entirely photochemically, producing his movies the old way, striking dailies, watching film prints on a daily basis during production and cutting negative. Due to Andersons obsession with high quality theatrical distribution, the film is being presented in 4k digital OR as I saw it, 70mm blow ups from the original camera negative. The print at the Arclight is directly from the negative, which is quite astonishing. There were moments when I shed a tear because of how good film looks when shot properly. Things like dynamic range, the delicious blacks and soft highlights, there is just no other way to put such a beautiful image onto a screen in my opinion.

Then there is Johnny Greenwood, or should I call him, the best composer for 2017. His score is by far, one of the best scores Ive ever heard, could be one of the best scores in cinema history. He did this with Andersons There Will Be Blood in 2008, but this time hes outdone himself. Not only did he reference period music, but also the classics, integrating many themes from classical composers. The theme can be heard on nonesuch records youtube page if you so desire to look it up. That piece is only one of a dozen pieces which lead you to remember the beautiful visuals and storytelling.

In retrospect, one has to admit this could Paul Thomas Andersons best movie and looking back on the years movies, by far the best movie of 2017 in my opinion. It has everything anyone could ever want in a movie, wonderful story, brilliant acting, set on a stage thats entertaining and provocative. Then you add all the technical accolades and the entire picture is perfect in my mind. As the movie finished and the credits came on, the finishing touch was the photochemical credits, something that nobody does anymore and it just reinforces the artistic beauty of the format. This isnt just a movie about whats on screen, but also a swan song to the photochemical process and the beauty that lives within. This is a movie that MUST be seen by any film buff, anyone who cares about the artistry and photochemical process.

I cant wait to see it again.

The Last Jedi

15 December 2017 - 04:11 AM

Well... I saw it.

Let me preface by stating I'm not gonna talk at all about the story, so don't worry about spoilers.

What I am going to talk about is the interesting mix of digital and anamorphic 35mm.

I'll first state that I felt the movie was well shot. From early on it had this really nice look that was in my opinion, a step above The Force Awakens. It's a crisp, nearly grain-free movie as well, which was unexpected considering they did use 500T quite a bit in dark situations. I really enjoy cinematographers who deliver a nearly grain-free image and I love cinematographers who light "just enough", both things were very present in this movie.

Now... and this was a funny thing... there was A LOT of digital in this movie. This was a real shocker and you could always tell because the oval boca disappeared and it was usually darker scenes where the digital cameras came out. Now, it was kinda hard to tell exactly what scenes were which setups when it's so dark AND you're trying to pay attention to a very fast paced story. So I didn't nail down exactly what was which, but I did notice the lack of the anamorphic boca all of a sudden, which upon closer look of those scenes, were for sure digital.

They also shot a bit of 15/65, but unlike Dunkirk which it was very noticeable on the standard 2.20:1 release, on The Last Jedi, it wasn't noticeable at all. I assume it was just the first opening scene which is mostly VFX anyway.

Yea, there were a few out of focus scenes... which was strange. Yea there were a lot of green screen shots. Yea, there was quite a bit of action and VFX work with no optical elements at all. Still, somehow the whole thing just worked nicely. There was some real stand out work in this film which everyone should be really proud of.

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